John Mancini

John Mancini, president and CEO of AIIM, is an author, speaker, and respected leader of the AIIM global community of information professionals. He is a catalyst in social, mobile, cloud, and big data technology adoption and an advocate for the new generation of experts who are driving the future of information management. John predicts that the next three years will generate more change in the way we deploy enterprise technologies and whom we trust with this task than in the previous two decades. His passion about the evolution of information workers into information analysts spurred John to establish the Certified Information Professional (CIP) program to enable anyone, anywhere to benchmark and develop new and strategic skills. His commitment to education includes the continual development of leading-edge training and publishing of ongoing industry research to help guide new thinking. As a frequent keynote speaker, John offers his expertise on the transformational challenges and opportunities facing information professionals and attracts over 100,000 visitors annually to his blog Digital Landfill. He has published six e-book titles including “#OccupyIT — A Technology Manifesto for Cloud, Mobile and Social Era” and the popular “8 Things You Need to Know About” e-book series. He has a Klout score in the high 60s, is ranked #5 in online SharePoint influence by harmon.ie and #42 in the KnowledgeLake SharePoint Influencer50. John can be found on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook as jmancini77.
Find me on:

Recent Posts

What Part of Being Blockbustered Don't You Understand?  Digital Transformation In Action

May 23, 2016 4:39:45 PM by John Mancini

Nobody wants to be Blockbustered.

It has become almost standard fare in the most presentations involving Digital Disruption to bring up the Blockbuster and Netflix example. So I thought it might be worthwhile to review quickly what happened to Blockbuster and then think a bit about other radically disruptive scenarios in a few other Industries.

The story starts in 1985. David Cook sold software in the oil and gas industry. There was a sharp downturn in that industry and he decided to open the first Blockbuster store in Dallas. Blockbuster grew rapidly and by 1994, they were sold for $8.4 billion to Viacom.

Check out this new AIIM white paper, by the way, Reimagining ECM in the Modern Enterprise, tied to a number of the themes in this post:

Download Now

A few years later, a fellow by the name of Reed Hastings was annoyed at being hit with $40 in late fees from Blockbuster for a rental of Apollo 13, and decided -- at a point when Blockbuster appeared invincible -- to do something about it. Netflix was born.

 

[I will add as a personal side note that in 1999 my middle son William, at the peak of the Blockbuster era, sold me a $15 Blockbuster card for $15. I didn't realize it until a few weeks later but there was only $1.72 on the card. He eventually wound up in software sales, likely indicating that long-term career choices are hinted at early in a child's development. But all of that's another story. ]

By 2004, Blockbuster had hit its peak with 9,000 stores globally and 5 billion dollars in revenues. At the same time, they separated from Viacom and launched their own DVD-by-subscription service -- about seven years after Netflix launched. By 2013, what was left of Blockbuster - now owned by Dish - was gone and the doors were shut.

Digital Disruption in Action.

Let's take a look at a few more examples.

This first chart shows the Google search history for Myspace. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist so see the point at which the “Facebook effect” kicked in. The speed with which this one happened is sometimes hard to believe.

Who could have forecasted in 2007 when the iPhone was introduced that it would ultimately lead to the demise of the leading handset provider in the world - in the space of just a few years:

The tidal wave of digital photography and Kodak's inability to adjust to that tidal wave is well-chronicled. Certainly the lights should have gone on in 2002 when the sales of digital cameras surpassed the sales of film cameras.

 Another cell phone example, and another victim of the disruption created by the iPhone.

The speed with which the business model for print publishing collapsed is still stunning. Less than a decade almost all of the value gone. The amazing thing about this story is that the value here -- largely driven by classified advertising -- wasn’t “acquired” by another disruptive player.  Rather a disruptive player created the conditions under which billions in value was simply distributed in tiny chunks to millions of end users. Craigslist.

And lastly, who can forget the example of printed books. The respective curves tell the story. We see the results all around us in the form of closed Borders and Barnes and Noble stores.

And lest we think that the content management space has been immune from ignoring the forces of disruption, here are two personal examples. I can remember back in 2007 sitting in meetings of established ECM players, and asking what they thought the impact of MOSS (Microsoft Office SharePoint Services) would be, and hearing the…”Interesting, but they don’t do what we do” response.  And a few years later, I recall hearing the same thing from some established vendors after hearing a Board briefing by Box.

All of this poses a couple of questions for any business.

Where is your disruption coming from? Odds are it is coming from someone that right now you think is irrelevant to you.

What are you going to do about it?

Have you tied your content strategy to your transformation strategy?

-----

Get on the advance list for the Information Professionals white paper HERE.

Here's the keynote deck in case you missed it. Socialize it and share it if you are so inclined. Also a fun compilation of AIIM16 Tweets HERE.

 

Read More

Topics: cip, information professionals, digital transformation,, digital disruption

Defining the Information Professional of the Future

May 18, 2016 9:41:04 AM by John Mancini

I've been working on capturing some of my thoughts post-AIIM16 about Information Professionals, and will be publishing these in a series of blog posts that will culminate in release of a new white paper on May 31.  

The first installment was called -- From Jurassic Park to Digital Transformation -- a Tale of Information Professionals.  Part Two was called -- A Short History of Where Information Professionals Came From.  Part Three was Disruptive Technologies Create Need for Information Professionals.

Reserve your advance copy of our new  Future of Information Professionals white paper -- due out May 31.

Defining the Information Professional of the Future

I concluded my previous post with this thought:

In the mainstream, the focus is still on on-premise applications built on and for the PC. The core skills that are valued in the mainstream are focused on building and developing systems. At the edge, the focus shifts to the cloud, mobile technologies become the Lego building blocks of systems, and the skill sets that are valued within our IT staffs shift from building and developing to configuring and connecting.

More to come in the next post.

-----

So continuing....

So let’s return to our PEOPLE -- PROCESS -- TECHNOLOGY triad and think about how the world has changed -- and will continue to change.

On the PROCESS side, a revolutionary thing has happened. Process owners can now implement their OWN solutions. This creates incredible pressure to take monolithic business processes and turn them into applications. On top of this, the world is rapidly shifting to one in which most interactions will be on mobile devices. This means all processes must be reformulated from a mobile perspective.



This has interesting implications when we think about the world of TECHNOLOGY. As mentioned earlier, configuring, connecting, and mobile skills are now critical and in short supply. We need to rethink the entire notion of security. Security that was once defined purely in terms of what was inside and outside the firewall now needs to be reconstructed around individual information assets. And organizations are experiencing a massive Legacy drain on their ability to innovate.

Perhaps the most extreme change has been on the PEOPLE side of the equation. We have moved into a world in which usability is EVERYTHING. Even individual users can implement their own enterprise-like solutions, and if we try to get in their way they will do it anyway. There has been an enormous blurring of the lines between what is the home and what is the office. There is no way to put this genie back in the bottle, and organizations must understand that Millennials operate in a fundamentally different fashion than the email generation.

The implications of this relative to how we manage information are profound. The kinds of questions that are being asked in our organizations vary greatly depending on whether you view the world from a PROCESS perspective, a TECHNOLOGY perspective, or a PEOPLE perspective. And in an era in which enterprise-like capabilities are increasingly available without IT intervention, the short-term pressure for each of these people to actually communicate and cooperate with each other is decreasing.

Each of these players in the information management story has a different role to play in the organization, and in some ways they are all versions of information professionals. However their needs and requirements are vastly different.



End users need education on responsible computing practices and need to understand how their organization wishes to place boundaries on their use of information. Now that process automation solutions are available to a much wider range of companies than ever before through SaaS solutions, line of business executives must be educated to better understand what is possible. And technology specialists must keep up with a wide range of content and information management solutions, understand the relative strengths and weaknesses of each, and try to forecast the survivability of individual companies into the future.

But this still leaves the fundamental question of the role of the Information Professional in all of this.

Someone needs to own the big picture.

Someone needs to provide adult supervision to the process people, technology people, and end users that interact with content and information management systems.

Someone needs to help the organization think through what it means to manage information as a critical business asset.

Someone needs to act as the translator of the unique language of each of the people who interact with our information systems, whether they are from a PEOPLE perspective a PROCESS perspective or a TECHNOLOGY perspective.

We believe that that person is an Information Professional, and the CIP (Certified Information Professional) is his/her badge.

Get on the advance list for the white paper HERE.

-----

Here's the keynote deck in case you missed it. Socialize it and share it if you are so inclined. Also a fun compilation of AIIM16 Tweets HERE.

 

Read More

Topics: cip, certified information professional, information professional, information professionals

Calling all Information Professionals – What #InfoGov Advice Would YOU give to this company?

May 12, 2016 12:47:31 PM by John Mancini

Calling all #InfoGov experts – What Advice Would YOU give?

I was thinking about one of the data points in our current State of the Industry Report (Free Executive Summary HERE) – the one that points to a rise in focus at large companies on risk and compliance as a primary business driver for IM.

The number of large organizations citing compliance and risk as the largest driver for IM has risen sharply in the past year from 38% to 59%. 44% of mid-sized organizations also cite this as the biggest driver whereas smaller organizations consider cost savings and productivity improvements to be more significant drivers.

To be honest, this data point bugged me a bit – it seemed at variance with some of my thoughts about Information Governance – i.e., that they key to moving Information Governance out of its narrow RM niche was to focus more on value rather than risk.

But I got a call from a significant company on the Fortune 1000 list (that will remain nameless for now) who posed a business problem that perhaps reinforces the above data point – but perhaps in a different way than I would normally consider the question. 

Here are the points he/she raised.  Kind of like a Harvard business case:

  1. We have our knowledge worker content currently in 3 places:  1) Google Docs; 2) an EFFS product; and 3) file shares.  We are not a SharePoint shop.
  2. We are not in an industry space like financial services or pharma where there are a lot of  industry-specific compliance or regulatory requirements.
  3. We want wherever possible to leave our existing information in place, and apply a “lite” governance layer (his/her words) above our 3 primary repositories that would allow us to understand what people are doing, apply retention and disposition where appropriate, be able to audit/verify these processes, and be able to apply holds should the occasion arise.
  4. Usability and simplicity – at both the administrative and individual knowledge worker level – is our top priority.
  5. In a nutshell, we want to be able to demonstrate that there is a level of adult supervision and accountability to how we manage our knowledge worker information. Does this need to be perfect, no.  Does it need to be a verifiable process, yes.
  6. We want to start with three departments, but then scale up.  Ultimately, the potential scale is quite large -- 10+ terabytes.
  7. We are not interested in a lot of workflow functionality at this point. Perhaps down the road, but for now this project is being driven by the legal folks. 
  8. The fundamental question we would like to address and at reasonable cost is a very basic one and one that you, John, have raised in your presentations:
Where should we tell our knowledge workers put their “stuff” so that it is…1) Secure, shareable, and searchable so the ORGANIZATION can accomplish its goals; and 2) Works the way they work and is useful to THEM in getting THEIR job done.

I have my own ideas about this, but I thought I would open it up to the community and perhaps everyone could share in the results. 

The Advice Clinic is Open.

What recommendations would you give, and why?

-----

You might also be interested in this white paper on EFFS technologies:

Download Now

 

Read More

Topics: information governance, electronic records management, records management, efss

The E3 Method of eDiscovery at the A+E Network

May 10, 2016 9:11:51 AM by John Mancini

Kevin Craine: Hubie Dorsainvil, Director of Litigation Support and Records Management at A+E Television Networks, and Gretchen Nadasky, Manager at Optimity Advisors, discussed the "E3 Method of Collaboration" at #AIIM16.  Tell us a bit about "E3."

Gretchen Nadasky: The E3 Method for collaboration came out of my experience for the records management project at A&E Network. Together, we were charged with developing a brand-new records management program at the company. It was something that was new to both executives and employees.

 

Since it was going to be an enterprise-wide program, we really had to get collaboration from all twenty-eight departments, as well as buy-in from all of the executives, all the way up to the CEO and the Board. We developed this way of building out a network explaining what records management is, through specific methods by developing messages so people would understand why records management was important to them. Through that experience, the E3 Method was born -- Engagement, Expectation, Enthusiasm.

Really anyone who has an idea, can benefit from the E3 Method. You can use the E3 Method whether you are trying to plan a vacation with your family, trying to do an enterprise-wide project that needs support of employees and executives, or trying to start a new process within a division of your company. It really can be used for anything as a way of getting things done.

The key point is that people have ideas, but they don't know how to initiate them and get support for ideas. Especially in the world of collaboration and networking, where everyone is expected to work together, the E3 methods can be used to make a road map. 

Companies like A&E are struggling with the incredible explosion in content that is being developed. It's great that we have all these new technologies, and that a lot of things are being transformed in a digital way. However, I don't think we are at the point yet, where people have their arms around how to manage all of that content, preserve it, and curate it, and audit it, and make sure they are not paying to store things that aren't useful, or helpful. 

Kevin Craine: Hubie, what are the particular litigation and records management challenges that you face at A&E Television?

Hubert Dorsainvil: My role at the company is to get the word on records management out into the actual company, so that everyone can start using those actual principles.  At the A&E Television Network we have a tremendous amount of data that we are trying to go through. We are trying to reduce the scope of actual discovery and not expose ourselves to litigation risk.

Part of the challenge is trying to control the volume of data that we have, that we can reduce the scope, and reduce our discovery costs in the process. As far as records management is concerned, we are new to this records management game, and we are trying to get everyone on board, so that they understand that records management is the responsibility of every single individual in the company. It's a daily function that should be practiced every single day. We are really trying to teach individuals how to use records management principles to conduct everyday business.

As a media company, we are in the forefront of all of this new technology in regards to digital media, and social media, and things of that nature. Everything is moving so fast. Technology is constantly changing. The amount of data that is out there is constantly growing. We are struggling trying to keep up with all this stuff. 

[Note: The above content was excerpted from an AIIM On Air podcast, hosted by Kevin Craine. Responsibility for the editing rests with me.  Check out the original podcast (and subscribe!) and also all the other additional podcast content -- much more to come!]

------

I'll be doing a member-only VIP debrief of AIIM16 on this presentation -- and 20 others! -- with Kevin on May 19.

Save Your Seat!

Some of my own post-AIIM16 musings can be found in these posts -- check them out.

 

Read More

Topics: aiim16

Part Three -- Disruptive Technologies Create Need for Information Professionals

May 9, 2016 11:27:47 AM by John Mancini

I've been working on capturing some of my thoughts post-AIIM16 about Information Professionals, and will be publishing these in a series of blog posts that will culminate in release of a new white paper on May 31.  

The first installment was called -- From Jurassic Park to Digital Transformation -- a Tale of Information Professionals.  Part Two was called -- A Short History of Where Information Professionals Came From.

Reserve your advance copy of our new  Future of Information Professionals white paper -- due out May 31.

Disruptive Technologies Create Need for Information Professionals.

I concluded my previous post with this thought:

The CIP has come to represent a badge of competency and knowledge at the top of the knowledge worker pyramid for those entrusted with the task of building an information STRATEGY in a time of digital disruption. Broader than Records Management and Information Governance, Information Professionals are charged with these questions:

Who owns the BIG PICTURE for how information is managed in our organization?
Who owns our information management STRATEGY?
Who can helps us treat information as the critical business asset it has become?

The accelerating pace of Digital Disruption makes this role more important -- and different -- than ever. But before going there, how exactly is the emerging era of Digital Transformation different from where we are now?

-----

So continuing....

While the concept of professionalism was emerging at AIIM and ARMA, back in the real world a lot of AMAZING technology changes were going on.

I have spoken for the past few years about three key disruptors:

Disruptor #1 -- CONSUMERIZATION is transforming what users expect from applications and how we deliver them. We are now in the era of user-centric IT.

Disruptor #2. CLOUD AND MOBILE are creating an expectation of anywhere, anytime access and transforming how we engage with customers and employees.

Disruptor # 3. THE INTERNET OF THINGS is generating massive amounts of new data and information creating enormous new challenges and opportunities.

An now to make things even more challenging, the impact of these disruptors is accelerating, with profound implications for how organizations manage their information assets.

Klaus Schwab, World Economic Forum: “The speed of current breakthroughs has no historical precedent.”

Steven Kottler: “For the first time in history, the world's leading experts on accelerating technology are consistently finding themselves too conservative in their predictions.”

Dion Hinchcliffe: “The old days of doing it all ourselves using traditional IT projects are receding and even counterproductive much of the time.”

I think one way of thinking about the radical disruption that is upon us is to think about how “Life in the Mainstream” is different from “Life at the Edge” across four variables:

MINDSETS -- “How do we look at things?”
MESSAGES -- “What stories do we tell when we get together?”
MONEY -- “Where is the money going?”
MACHINES -- “What are our technology building blocks?”

In each case, I will talk about three representative data points that describe what life looks like in the mainstream, and compare this to what life looks like at the edge. This is not to imply that life in the mainstream is universally bad or undesirable, or that life at the edge is universally good and desired. Rather, the point is the highlight how things are changing and to urge organizations to think through the dimensions of this change and how it manifests itself in your particular organization.

So let's start with MINDSETS and how we look at things.

In the mainstream, if we have a technology need, we think these terms: 1) Set up a meeting with IT; 2) Make sure we control the information we have; and 3) Look at how we might update our legacy systems.



Compare this to life at the edge. At the edge, we think in very different terms: 1) How I can do it myself without IT intervention? 2) How do I set information free and put it to work? And 3) How can I quickly roll out an app -- without being dragged into endless discussions about updating a legacy system?

Similarly, the MESSAGES we use to communicate in the mainstream -- the stories we share -- tell a lot about our fundamental assumptions with regards to technology.

In the mainstream -- when we get together around expense-account lunches and around the water cooler -- when it comes to collaboration, we often talk about SharePoint. We also talk about how we might take traditional processes like bank teller facilitated deposits -- these typically cost $0.65 each -- and how we might automate that process. Linked to both of the above, our IT Heroes are those that bring greater efficiency into the organization.



Compare these messages and stories to the ones that we tell at the edge. The Cool Kids on the Block are all talking about Slack, an enterprise collaboration platform that in the span of less than 18 months has grown to a market valuation of over three billion dollars. Now Slack may very likely not be the solution for many large Enterprises, but the way of thinking about the problem of collaboration that surrounds Slack -- its nimbleness and openness -- needs to be part of the way that we rethink collaboration.

Taking the example of bank deposits, at the edge, the focus is on mobile deposits, which typically cost less than $0.03 each. Mainstream organizations try desperately to automate a core set of processes and services that have $.65 as their foundation. Edge organizations seek competitive redefinition by ignoring mainstream processes and reinvent the banking industry around processes with $.03 as their foundation. These types of market disequilibriums are occurring in countless processes and industries throughout the economy. This translates into a new set of IT Heroes -- those who can quickly bring innovation and value into our organizations.

Let's turn now to MONEY. Where is the money going and what does this mean?

In the mainstream world, the market valuation for General Motors is $55 billion. At the edge, Uber is now valued at $68 billion. In the physical world -- in the bricks-and-mortar world -- we seek to add digital capabilities to our existing physical business models in order to compete with companies that are natively digital. That is challenging enough. But the challenge is about to accelerate as digital companies like Amazon seek to open up physical storefronts and as digital companies like Uber seek to extend their value proposition into logistics and package delivery.



It is worth thinking about how fundamental Facebook, Amazon, Apple, and Google have become to our collective economic future and what their models of success say about the future. These four companies alone have a market value of $1.3 trillion. This is the same as the GDP of Korea. These four horsemen of the digital world provide perspectives on what life at the edge looks like that we need to incorporate into our mainstream thinking.

Lastly, let us turn to the question of MACHINES. What are our technology building blocks?



In the mainstream, the focus is still on on-premise applications built on and for the PC. The core skills that are valued in the mainstream are focused on building and developing systems. At the edge, the focus shifts to the cloud, mobile technologies become the Lego building blocks of systems, and the skill sets that are valued within our IT staffs shift from building and developing to configuring and connecting.

More to come in the next post.  

Get on the advance list for the white paper HERE.

-----

Here's the keynote deck in case you missed it. Socialize it and share it if you are so inclined. Also a fun compilation of AIIM16 Tweets HERE.

 

Read More

Topics: cip, information professionals

Part Two -- A short history of where Information Professionals Came From

May 5, 2016 2:49:18 PM by John Mancini

I've been working on capturing some of my thoughts post-AIIM16 about Information Professionals, and will be publishing these in a series of blog posts that will culminate in release of a new white paper on May 31.  

The first installment was called -- From Jurassic Park to Digital Transformation -- a Tale of Information Professionals.  This is part 2. 

Reserve your advance copy of our new  Future of Information Professionals white paper -- due out May 31.

A Short History of Where Information Professionals Came From.

I concluded my previous post with this thought:

Many people do not realize that AIIM was founded in 1943 as the National Microfilm Association. Many people are mystified about how an organizational journey could somehow begin in 1943 with microfilm, and wind up in 2016 with content and information management.

So what is the connective tissue in this strange story?

I think it boils down to 3 words.

People. Process. Technology.

-----

So continuing....

A Short History of Where Information Professionals Came From.

Of course, what People + Process + Technology adds up to IF DONE RIGHT -- is intelligent information management, which is what AIIM is all about. The reason I say “If Done Right” is that over the course of managing this triad, organizations have tended to get parts of this equation right, but seldom do they get all three working in sync. Which is why there is so must frustration out there. I happen to think that an “Information Professional” is the person that weaves this story together, but I’m getting ahead of myself.



Let me go through a very short pre-history of how we came to think there was even such a thing as an “information professional” in the context of this triad of PEOPLE and PROCESS and TECHNOLOGY.

From 1996 to 2006, the PROCESS questions we asked in our organizations centered around this fundamental question: “How can we automate content-intensive, complicated, and mission-critical processes?”

On the TECHNOLOGY side, most implementations in this period were complex and custom and expensive. There was no standard body of knowledge. Technology expertise was lodged in the consulting community. Looking over to the PEOPLE side of the equation, solutions were difficult to use and required LOTS of training. But nobody really cared because the people who used the solutions were specialists and were only a tiny percentage of the overall number of knowledge workers in our organizations.



“Professionalism” in this world was narrowly defined. If you think about the overall universe of knowledge workers, you can divide them into Gurus, Techies, Line of Business executives, and Everybody Else (in other words, those pesky end users). “Professionalism” in this world was defined principally by AIIM with its MIT and LIT designations (“Master” and “Laureate” of information technology) and by ARMA/ICRM with its Certified Records Management (CRM) certification. And the focus was on the tippy top of the pyramid.





In this tight little world, something was missing. Even 20 years later, there are still less than 1,000 CRMs in the world. The CRM certification was (and still is) extremely valuable, but it only tapped into the surface of the education needed by technology and business people. There was clearly a need for industry-standard technology education, focused on standardizing the hodge-podge of consultant delivered training that was the norm in 2006.

In 2006, the nature of content, records, and information management training changed with the launch of AIIM’s ECM Practitioner, Specialist, and Master training programs. AIIM followed up its standardized ECM training with training in Electronic Records Management, Business Process Management, SharePoint, and a host of other content technologies. By 2010, the concept of “professionalism” was stretched to also include the “techie” and line of business communities via the AIIM designations.

In 2010, AIIM came to the conclusion that there was an opportunity to standardize an even broader body of knowledge under the concept of a “Certified Information Professional,” or CIP.

AIIM’s original conception of what it meant to be an “information professional” was not unlike the definition of professionalism that came to be accepted in the 1980s and 1990s in project management. In the early stages of the professionalization of project management, if you had proposed that there was a common body of project management knowledge that could stretch across a wide variety of domains and industries, people would have thought you were crazy. “How could the project management knowledge to run a software project possibly be similar to that required to build a bridge or that required to construct a building?” In the course of the 1980s and 1990s, the Project Management Institute succeeded in establishing the PMP as the standard body of knowledge associated with project management across a broad variety of disciplines.

It its original conception, AIIM thought the CIP would become an “everyman’s” certification, relevant to gurus and techies and business people alike. The reality after 1,000 CIPs and six years is that it has come to signify something different.

The CIP has come to represent a badge of competency and knowledge at the top of the knowledge worker pyramid for those entrusted with the task of building an information STRATEGY in a time of digital disruption. Broader than Records Management and Information Governance, Information Professionals are charged with these questions:

Who owns the BIG PICTURE for how information is managed in our organization?
Who owns our information management STRATEGY?
Who can helps us treat information as the critical business asset it has become?

The accelerating pace of Digital Disruption makes this role more important -- and different -- than ever. But before going there, how exactly is the emerging era of Digital Transformation different from where we are now?  More to come in the next post.  

Get on the advance list for the white paper HERE.

-----

Here's the keynote deck in case you missed it. Socialize it and share it if you are so inclined. Also a fun compilation of AIIM16 Tweets HERE.

 

Read More

Topics: cip, information professionals

From Jurassic Park to Digital Transformation -- a Tale of Information Professionals

May 3, 2016 7:42:05 AM by John Mancini

It is literally 20 years to the day since I first started at AIIM. I've been thinking about how the technology landscape has changed since I first walked on the scene at AIIM and what the implications of these changes are for how we think about what it means to be an “Information Professional."  This was the heart of what I spoke about during my keynote at AIIM16, and will be getting my thoughts down in this blog over the next few weeks prior to release of a new white paper on May 31.  

Reserve your advance copy of our new  Future of Information Professionals white paper -- due out May 31.

How We Got Here

Slate.com did a good article a while back talking about how much technology has changed since 1996. They used the term “Jurassic Web” to describe 1996, and I rather like that characterization.

 

So let's think a little bit about what 1996 looked like:

  • Only 20 million American adults had access to the internet.
  • Something called “a blog” was still three years away.
  • 99% of phone users did not find text messaging to be of any use whatsoever -- assuming they even knew what it was.
  • The first iPhone was still 11 years away.  That’s right, 11 years in the future.
  • Microsoft Office 97 was published in December on CD-ROM but also - get this - on a set of 45 (forty-five!) 3.5 inch floppy disks.

In 1996 there was no YouTube. No Huffington Post. No Google. No Twitter. No Facebook. And no Wikipedia.

In 1996, AIIM was also in what I would call the pre-web phase of its existence. One month before I joined AIIM, the association's magazine, INFORM, had this quote:

“Despite the area of Internet enthusiasm and the hyped up selling palaver of some web services providers, we remain uncertain as to the long run substitute benefits the internet will bring to businesses and to individual users.

Oops.

As Yogi would say. “It's tough to make predictions especially about the future.” I'm especially glad that this AIIM prediction was before my time.

How did AIIM Survive for all of these years?

So that's the backdrop for the past 20 years. Of course, against this, AIIM goes back even further. Many people do not realize that AIIM was founded in 1943 as the National Microfilm Association. Many people are mystified about how an organizational journey could somehow begin in 1943 with microfilm, and wind up in 2016 with content and information management.

So what is the connective tissue in this strange story?

I think it boils down to 3 words.

People. Process. Technology.

More to come.  Get on the advance list for the white paper HERE.

-----

Here's the keynote deck in case you missed it. Socialize it and share it if you are so inclined. Also a fun compilation of AIIM16 Tweets HERE.

 

Read More

Topics: information professionals

3 Quick Snapshots You Don't Want to Miss From #AIIM16

May 1, 2016 10:00:44 PM by John Mancini

There will be more follow-up re AIIM16 in the weeks ahead, but suffice it to say it was one incredible event.  800 people pasionate about helping their organizations turn information chaos into information opportunity.  On behalf of the staff, thanks so much to the speakers and attendees who made #AIIM16 a roaring success.

Read More

Topics: information governance, information chaos, digital transformation,, aiim16

Proving Content Management Marketing Effectiveness and ROI Still a Challenge

May 1, 2016 4:17:12 PM by John Mancini

Read More

Topics: content management marketing

Where do you stand? -- 6 Key Findings - new "State of Information Management" Benchmark report

Apr 15, 2016 12:08:09 PM by John Mancini

What's the status of Information Management in your organization?

Check out our new State of the Industry findings.

Download Your Report

Managing and recording what the organization knows, what has been said, what inputs are received, what decisions and commitments have been made, and what results are achieved, is paramount to improvement and success. Failure to manage this information, and make it available for sharing, search, controlled access, defined process, audit and secure archive limits operational capability, stunts new initiatives and exposes the business to potential liabilities.

In this [free] executive summary, we've compiled our key findings, including:

  • How different ECM system strategies match the overall goals of the information management lifecycle.
  • The governance and adoption issues that users face.
  • The impact of extending access to mobile and the new cloud services.
AIIM's new Industry Watch report -- 6 key findings:
  1. The number of large organizations citing compliance and risk as the largest driver for IM has risen sharply in the past year from 38% to 59%. 44% of mid-sized organizations also cite this as the biggest driver whereas smaller organizations consider cost savings and productivity improvements to be more significant drivers.
  2. 17% of responding organizations have completed an enterprise-wide ECM capability, including 4% on a global scale. 23% are rolling out company-wide, and a further 15% are integrating across departments. 6% are looking to replace existing system(s) with a new one.
  3. Only 18% align their IM/ECM system strategies with agreed IG policies. 15% have IG policies but they do not drive decisions. 29% have no IG policies. 
  4. 39% describe their email management as “chaotic”, including the largest organizations. 55% agree that email is their big untagged, ungoverned, high-risk content type. Only 10% selectively archive emails to ECM, RM or SharePoint.
  5. 22% consider their ECM project to be somewhat stalled, and 21% have user adoption issues. 52% admit that they are still dependent on their network file-shares.
  6. 38% are actively focused on extending their ECM functionality and 25% are rolling out to a wider user-base. 30% are improving collaboration and 21% are working on mobile and remote access.

Get it while it's hot!

Download Your Report

Read More

Topics: industry watch, enterprise content management, content, ecm, aiim, Industry statistics and research

About AIIM

AIIM provides market research, expert advice, and skills development to an empowered community of leaders committed to information-driven innovation.

Subscribe to Email Updates

21 Tips to Put Digital Transformation in Action