AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

Guest Post - Five Keys to Leading in the Age of Analytics

Apr 17, 2017 2:31:31 PM by Andrew Wells


[Note:  This is a guest post by Andrew Wells and Kathy Chiang. Andrew Roman Wells is the CEO of Aspirent, a management-consulting firm focused on analytics. Kathy Williams Chiang is VP, Business Insights, at Wunderman Data Management. They are the co-authors of Monetizing Your Data: A Guide to Turning Data into Profit-Driving Strategies and Solutions. For more information, please visit www.monetizingyourdata.com.]

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Topics: analytics, big data, data analytics

13 Things You Don't Know About Content Analytics

Apr 5, 2017 10:46:00 AM by John Mancini

Content analytics provides the “last mile” of insight, ultimately required for automating business processes and creating customer-centered journeys that go beyond conventional encounters. 

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Topics: content analytics, text analytics, analytics

The convergence of analytics, cognitive computing and machine learning

Jan 18, 2017 4:38:24 PM by John Mancini

AIIM’s resident Podcaster Extraordinaire, Kevin Craine, recently sat down with Andrea Chiappe, Director of Innovation and Strategy at Systemware to discuss opportunities in the convergence of analytics, cognitive computing and machine learning. The following is a short synopsis of the interview.  You can find the full podcast interview HERE.

Part two of the interview was a discussion with Claudia Kieran, Corporate Senior Accountant at Wildman Business Group, about their efforts at Wildman to become more paper free, and how they did it.  I’ll be following up this post with a second post to tell Claudia’s story.

Kevin:  Why do you feel that the scope and idea of information governance needs to more than just records management?

Andrea:  When I look at the words “records management,” I have to admit that even I think it sounds a little bit boring. It implies a singular objective and a singular solution. I look at information governance as not so singular. Traditional records management is linear in nature – we classify records, we maintain and retain records, and after their retention period is past, we get rid of records.  Information governance is more of an ecosystem. Although records management absolutely is still a legitimate endeavor, I think we need to think in terms of an overall umbrella or ecosystem of governance. 

Kevin:  When you say that content management is critical enabling technology for digital transformation but not in its traditional form, what do you mean by that?

Andrea:  First generation content management systems look at information control as king – “I better hold my information tightly and never let it go.” I see the future as our industry as an absolutely open information ecosystem where yes, compliance and security are key, but the emphasis in on allowing for curated information to get out and be put to use.  I don't think that the traditional way we define content management will be the dominant definition in 2020.

Kevin:  We hear a lot about analytics, cognitive computing, machine learning, and how these technologies can be leveraged to improve things like customer experiences.  What are the things that we should consider now as we map our strategies with respect to analytics and machine learning?

Andrea:  First and foremost, this is not an overnight deal rather it is a journey. Your road map and strategies must align with the objectives and use cases we identify as benefiting from these technologies and know that they will evolve. Benefiting from cognitive technologies require that you measure outcomes and continue to tune and train your systems and users. In fact, ensure that you plan to govern the tuning mechanisms and training sets closely whether human built or system generated. The competitive advantages that businesses stand to gain are undeniable and as these technologies continue to evolve they will take on a life of their own.

Kevin:  You say that we can no longer just put on band-aids onto our infrastructures as we think about moving forward. How can we adjust our focus to include a more transformed governance approach as part of our strategy and not as an afterthought?

Andrea:  It is important to take a step back and consider if the technologies that we leverage in our organizations are providing a foundation and environment to move forward. The current pace of innovation demands that we identify those things that are helping versus hindering our road map initiatives in order to remain competitive. Keep in mind that testing our business plans and technologies against the vision of where we want to be seven to ten years from now should not be a happening it should be an ongoing endeavor.

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Download this free white paper -- Process Improvement and Automation 2016
Research shows many business leaders understand now more than ever before, that information and process form an integrated component of business operations as a whole. This report from AIIM Market Intelligence and underwritten in part by Systemware, takes a look at the current state of BPM.

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You might also be interested in this.  27% of organizations see content analytics (CA) as essential now, with 59% citing they see it as essential within the next 5 years. Beyond “big data” style business intelligence, analytics is driving auto-classification, content remediation, security correction, adaptive case management, and process monitoring and modeling.  Get a copy of the executive summary of AIIM's new market research study -- Using Analytics: Automating Processes and Extracting Knowledge -- to find out more.

DOWNLOAD YOUR EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

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Topics: ecm, analytics, machine learning, cognitive computing

6 Things You Need to Know About Emerging Markets and Information Management

Aug 18, 2016 1:11:04 PM by John Mancini

 

Digital disruption is moving quickly past the surface level of disruption as technology innovation in the consumer realm gets incorporated into the very fabric of how business is done, creating radical disruption along the way.  All of this ultimately manifests itself in international trade, financial, and data flows and the impact these on the individual knowledge skills that workers need to have to survive and the organizational competencies in information management that companies and governments require to continue to be relevant and competitive.

I came across a great McKinsey study on this, Digital globalization: The new era of global flows which got me thinking about the six points below. 

6 Things You Need to Know About Emerging Markets and Information Management

  1. The global trade, services, and financials flows that have traditionally driven the world’s economy have stalled. 
  2. We are now in an era in which global data and information flows are the primary determinant of economic benefit.
  3. Digital disruption will be accelerated by the growing gaps between the world as it was and the world it is becoming.
  4. Emerging markets are where much of the growth in information management will occur in the next decade.
  5. Radical disruption and its impact on emerging markets is opening up a host of opportunities for new players.
  6. In order to capitalize on the opportunities arising in emerging markets, organization must look hard at their organizational structures and the information systems that support them – and that means content management

Download the full Tip Sheet for more information!

Download the Tipsheet!

 You might also be interested in this post:

Brexit, Presidential Campaign Follies, the Olympics and Disruption Déjà vu

 

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Topics: data, content management, analytics, emerging markets

11 Facts You Didn't Know About #Content #Analytics and #BigData

Jun 16, 2015 10:28:00 AM by John Mancini

11 Facts You Didn't Know About Content Analytics

The information below is from the new AIIM survey, Content Analytics: automating processes and extracting knowledge.

Fact #1 -- Content analytics is fast becoming a pivotal business tool, with six in 10 enterprises saying it will be essential within five years’ time.

Fact #2 -- Three-quarters of enterprises believe there is real business insight to be gained from content analytics, further highlighting its position as a technology that adds true value to an organization.

Fact #3 -- Content analytics – which analyzes and derives insight from inbound and legacy content - is also seen as increasingly essential to addressing risks associated with incorrectly identified content. Respondents felt auto-classification of content helps protect against security breaches, sensitive or offensive content, and exposure to compliance regulations. More than half of enterprises (54 percent) feel that their organization is at considerable risk from such threats. 

Download new free report on Content Analytics

Fact #4 -- Despite contact analytics’ potential, 80 percent of survey respondents have yet to allocate a senior role to initiate and coordinate analytics applications. This lack of designated leadership and shortfall of analytics skills is restricting the potential and holding back the deployment of content analytics tools, according to almost two-thirds (63 percent) of the research respondents.

Fact #5 -- Around three-quarters (73 percent) of respondents feel that enhancing the value of legacy content is better than wholesale deletion, while more than half (53 percent) say that auto-classification using content analytics is the only way to get content chaos under control.

6 MORE key facts about content analytics:

  1. Nearly two-thirds of respondents say that content analytics is either essential (17 percent) or something they definitely need (48 percent).
  2. Thirty-four percent of organizations are using content analytics for process automation, information governance, contextual search or business insight.
  3. Benefits from inbound analytics include faster flowing processes (50 percent), happier staff (32 percent) and improved governance (20 percent).
  4. Content analytics early adopters are already seeing the benefits, with 68 percent reporting ROI within 18 months or less.
  5. Most survey respondents expect to spend more on content analytics in the next 12 months.
  6. Incoming customer communications and help desk streams top the list for live or near-time alerting.
A few thoughts from Doug Miles, the author of the report:

 “We have seen increasing interest and adoption in recognition and routing of inbound content, automated classification of records and email, metadata addition and correction, and all of the improvements in access, security, de-duplication and retention that flow from this. But content analytics can offer so much more than this, with many applications and uses yet to come, and by 2020 will be one of the primary tools used by any enterprise.”

Check out our brand new Content Analytics course!

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Some other recent posts that might be of interest...

The research for ‘Content Analytics: automating processes and extracting’ was underwritten in part by Kofax, Rocket Software, SPS and OpenText.

The full report, which includes a number of recommendations for progress, is free to download at http://info.aiim.org/contentanalytics

The survey was taken using a web-based tool by 238 individual members of the AIIM community between April 17, 2015, and May 8, 2015.

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Topics: content analytics, information governance, analytics, big data

With apologies to Julie Andrews, these are a few of my favorite #AIIM15 tweets

Apr 6, 2015 2:32:00 PM by John Mancini

Here is a sampling from some of my favorite #AIIM15 tweets.  Enjoy.

If you weren't able to attend in San Diego, we hope to see you next year in New Orleans.  And here is a short (and FREE!) e-book to give you an idea of what you missed...

Click here to Download

 

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Topics: RISK, process automation, content management, ecm, engagement, analytics

The #AIIM15 Digital Transformation Hot Seat: The Dark and Dirty of Big Data

Jan 21, 2015 1:42:49 PM by John Mancini

As we start to think about #AIIM15, I thought I would ask a number of our sponsors a few identical questions in order to get an understanding of how they see the future of our industry -- and let those of you attending start to think about your own questions to ask them in San Diego.  Here are the three questions I'll ask:

  1. What are the three biggest challenges you see your customers facing while trying to “Embrace the Chaos”?
  2. What do you see as the three most important trends related to Information Management facing organizations over the next 18-24 months? What will be different in our industry two years from now?
  3. What are the three most important things attendees should know about your company?

Roger Beharry Lall, Director of Market Strategy and Research at Adlib Software, says organizations need to take control of their information today before it hits critical mass.

What are the three biggest challenges you see your customers facing while trying to “Embrace the Chaos”?

  1. The collection, organization and publishing of all of the required information in order to meet compliance demands – from internal corporate mandates to broad-based industry standards like FDA, SOX and more.
  2. The inability to access content to support business growth. Organizations are looking to improve collaboration across the enterprise, which means better access to content. One way to do this is to implement effective archiving solutions so that content is always accessible and available for the long term. Leveraging industry standards like PDF/A will enable teams across the organization to access content at any time from anywhere. 
  3. The inability to understand and access information. While organizations have done a good job of moving from paper to electronic format, and standardizing with formats like PDF for digitally born content, they now face an additional challenge around digesting this information: ensuring that text and images are readable; that information can be accessed automatically without manual reformatting; easily extracting insight from documents; sorting, de-duplicating, attributing and deleting files. These are all critical, but often ignored in favor of more advanced ‘Big Data’ initiatives. 

What do you see as the three most important trends related to Information Management facing organizations over the next 18-24 months? What will be different in our industry two years from now?

  1. The shift in focus from “Big Data” projects to more specific projects like addressing “Dark Data” and “Dirty Data”, focusing on more effective/efficient content analytics endeavors. 
  2. The recognition that content management solutions should be “enterprise” , not departmental solutions.
  3. With more and more importance being placed on compliance, the PDF and PDF/A standards will become more and more prevalent in solving this for organizations. Moreover though, organizations will actively look at solutions to optimize those PDFs making them more accessible, standardized, and automated. 

We believe that in two years, information chaos will have reached an all time high unless organizations act now to gain control of their content. This situation will put many of them at great risk. Think compliance, archiving, the draining of resources. There is a way to get ahead of the curve and proactively ensure content is secure so that in two years they aren’t playing catch up and having to turn their attention away from core business projects to deal with document problems.

What are the three most important things attendees should know about your company?

  1. That PDF is more than just a standard - it can be applied to organizations in a broad range of industries to solve complex business problems 
  2. That our Advanced Rendering technology centralizes, automates and enhances critical business processes like compliance and archiving – reducing manual dependencies to reduce information risk. 
  3. That customers and partners are using Advanced Rendering technology not only for content output and archiving, but also to optimize the capture and ingestion of incoming or digitally born information.
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Topics: PDF/A, aiim conference, analytics, big data

New #AIIM White Paper on #BigData -- Too Much Yin, Not Enough Yang

Feb 13, 2013 4:07:00 AM by John F. Mancini

There is a frenzy around big data today. But beneath the froth and the hype is this underlying and undeniable fact: big data will change the world. Companies – you – need to start looking beyond the hype and the technology to learn how you unlock your big data and put it to work for you.

AIIM’s work with the Executive Leadership Council is where you start. Key findings in this report include:

  • considering the BUSINESS side of the big data equation
  • teaming data scientists with information professionals
  • embracing a new way of working
  • striking the right balance between analysis and action for businesses
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Topics: IBM, technology, sas, emc, analytics, big data, bigdata

Free #BigData Toolkit from #AIIM

Jul 2, 2012 1:17:04 PM by John F. Mancini

We've put together a toolkit to help our community understand...

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Topics: content management, aiim, analytics, big data

10 useful tips on getting started with #BigData

Jun 4, 2012 5:00:39 PM by John F. Mancini

The following are a few tips from AIIM analyst Doug Miles about getting started with Big Data and Big Content.  The excerpt is from our Industry Watch -- Big Data - Extracting Value from your Digital Landfill.  Downloads are free.

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Topics: erm, content management, ecm, aiim, analytics, big content, records management, big data

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AIIM provides market research, expert advice, and skills development to an empowered community of leaders committed to information-driven innovation.

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