AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

Don’t Let Data Overwhelm You

Oct 3, 2018 11:00:00 AM by Kate Dalton-Hoffman

Are you finding yourself overwhelmed by the amount of data you have to manage? While it's great to stay up with the latest technology, digital transformation can sometimes leave people feeling like there was a document "explosion" in their department. Not to worry, we're here to help.

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Topics: digitization, digital transformation,, big data, office365, records management

Implementing Information Management on SharePoint and Office365

Nov 17, 2017 12:42:35 PM by Jesse Wilkins

It's hard to overestimate the impact of SharePoint on the information management market. Since its humble beginnings in 2001, it has grown to nearly 200 million seats and is found in every industry sector. If you're reading this blog post, you likely have SharePoint in your organization.

But SharePoint can't magically make your information more accessible. There is no SharePoint fairy that assesses all your information, uploads just the valuable stuff to SharePoint, applies appropriate access controls, and fills in the metadata. In fact, most organizations with SharePoint aren't particularly satisfied with it - through no fault of SharePoint or its capabilities. Rather, there are two main issues.

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Topics: sharepoint, office365, information management, governance

The Upside-Down World of Content Management – Again

May 9, 2017 1:14:08 PM by John Mancini

"The World Turned Upside Down" is an English ballad, first published in the middle of the 1640s to protest the policies of Parliament relating to Christmas.  Parliament believed the holiday should be a solemn occasion, and outlawed traditional English Christmas celebrations.

Fans of the musical Hamilton will recognize the tune in another context.  After Battle of Yorktown in 1781, “The World Turned Upside-Down” was the song played by the British band as the British and Hessian troops marched out to surrender, the last major battle of the American Revolution, signifying the end of the British era in the Colonies.

In 2007, SharePoint began the long process of turning the world of ECM – Enterprise Content Management – upside down

This is what the ECM landscape looked like in 2007:

  • The focus was on automating content intensive, complicated, mission-critical processes within departments at very large organizations.  Think check processing in banking, or forms processing in insurance, or the new drug application process in pharmaceuticals.
  • Solutions were complex, custom and expensive and purchased by business buyers.
  • And most importantly, solutions were difficult to use and required LOTS of training.  But that really didn’t matter because “users” were limited to a handful of “documents” and “records” and “process” specialists within organizations.

Up until 2007.

While it was technically released at the end of 2006, in 2007, SharePoint (Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007, or ‘MOSS’) began to redefine the ECM industry around general knowledge workers rather than document “specialists” and leveraged Microsoft’s presence with IT staff. The ECM industry was in the process of being turned upside down, although at the time few realized it. In the early days of SharePoint MOSS, I asked a group of leading ECM providers what they thought about SharePoint.  The almost universal response was, “Well, I don’t know what SharePoint is doing, but it isn’t what we do.” 

After about a billion dollars in sales in what seemed like record time, the ECM industry recognized that the world had indeed been turned upside down, and ECM players refocused around working with rather than against SharePoint. 

from ECM to Intelligent Information Management

The important thing to remember in the context of the current changes going on in the ECM space is during the first phase of the revolution, the frame of reference was still “traditional” ECM – content intensive, complicated, mission-critical processes within departments at very large organizations.  We tried to force all of that unruly and ad hoc knowledge worker content into a “traditional” ECM frame.  We tried to do this by putting additional content management solutions on top of SharePoint.

Knowledge worker content was still somewhat of an afterthought to supposedly “real” ECM content.  The fundamental assumptions for how we viewed content management remained those of “traditional” ECM.  The bias within the broader ECM community was still focused on those who needed to record content rather than those who need to work with content on a daily basis.

Fast forward to 2017. 

After a decade of radical change in consumer, mobile, and cloud technologies, we are on the cusp of a second revolution, one that truly will turn the content world upside down.  Forrester’s division of the content space into Transactional Content Services and Business Content Services reflects the revolution that is underway.

Forrester believes that transactional content drives high-volume customer-focused processes. In my terminology, this is the world of “traditional” ECM.  This is separate and different from business content.  Business content “includes familiar formats such as office documents, spreadsheets, email, and multimedia. The content may be formal (with structured templates or forms) or informal (created ad hoc)” and is directly tied to the experience of knowledge workers on a day-to-day basis.  

Businesses are looking for people-centric, simple processes allowing for a balance between personal management capabilities and organizational management requirements.  It is here that the future of content management is being defined.

Microsoft defines the stages of a modern content strategy as follows:

  • Create -- Create, collect, and share the documents you need to get your work done.
  • Coordinate -- Structure your teamwork and work together, using co-authoring, metadata, groups, taxonomy, and collaborative tools.
  • Protect -- Manage compliance and reduce risk with life cycle management, information architecture, auditing, rights management, and eDiscovery.
  • Harvest -- With efficient enterprise content services, use analytics to drive discovery, gain more control over content, and take more attuned actions which lead to better decisions.

While the Create/Coordinate/Protect/Harvest terms are Microsoft terms, they do reflect eight fundamental forces of disruption that are turning ECM upside-down once again – for real this time.

  1. The user experience in creating and sharing content is central to every follow-on content stage.
  2. Documents and content must be “born” managed – with fundamental content management metadata baked in at creation rather than bolted on.
  3. Metadata driven policies are increasingly critical to guide a piece of content from creation to archive and disposition and how it is throughout this lifecycle.
  4. Increasingly complex – and often contradictory – industry, legal, and government requirements increasing the need for a coherent information governance strategy.
  5. Organizations are demanding on premise, cloud, and hybrid solutions that work interchangeably.
  6. Privacy and security strategies are being redefined around what a document is rather than being based upon the devices upon which it is viewed.
  7. Users are demanding the ability to disaggregate content capabilities and to be able to buy and consume content management capabilities by the drink rather than buy the gallon.
  8. Process owners want to control how day-to-day processes are automated, and organizations want sanity and consistency in how this is done.

All of which points to yet another upside-down flip in the content management space.  This time, it’s a revolution truly originating with the needs and requirements of individual knowledge workers.  It is also a revolution that I think will ultimately redefine not only the world of business content, but also how transactional content is managed. Reevaluating traditional “legacy” ECM implementations in business content terms – rather than the other way around – will ultimately turn the ECM world upside-down.

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Topics: Microsoft Corporation, office365, sharepoint, ecm, enterprise content management

UPDATE - Can @jmancini77 Survive Solely in the #Cloud on a Cheap $192 #Chromebook for 30 Days? - Week Two Report

Feb 29, 2016 4:25:26 PM by John Mancini

Feb 9

I like to periodically upset my normal work and personal patterns and try something different for 30 days just to see what I learn from the process. 

So for the next 30 days, here’s my little internal stress test:

Can a real life business executive survive in the cloud on a $192 computer for 30 days?  

OK, it's arguable whether I am a “real life business executive,” but as the lawyers like to say (my wife and I have been binging on Good Wife), let’s stipulate that.  

For the next 30 days, I will try to survive only in the cloud on a Chromebook. More specifically, on a 2G Asus C20 that cost $192. We’ll see. I will log any insurmountable difficulties or problems or observations and report back on a weekly basis.

asus.jpg

Feb 10

On my MAC, I love the ctr-alt-4 to take a screenshot of a portion of a screen -- especially useful in presentations. Hmmm...Wonder how I do this on this machine?  OK, here’s how to do it on a Chromebook. Works like a charm.

screenshot.png

 

Feb 11

Hmmm...apparently there is no Lync or Skype for Business online. Or am I missing something? Bizarre given all the rest of Office365 services are available online, including some products I’ve never heard of. Sigh. Have Skype for Business on my phone, so I will cover that base there.

Sure can't do the following on a Chromebook. I need to make a movie of old pics for my wife for Valentine’s Day. Back to the MAC for that -- here’s the LINK, BTW! [Note: I’m hoping that Youtube actually sticks to and actually understands their own policies re copyrighted music -- which say if a song is on their list, it’s OK, but the artist can place ads -- seems fair.]  We’ll see if I get a takedown notice.  If I do, you’re liable to see a silent movie.

Feb 12

Day three of using only the Office365 interface for email, calendars, etc. rather than Outlook 2011 for MAC (2011?). This is taking some getting used to. Driving me nuts that you can’t get to calendar directly from the email view (have to click back out to the main screen).  Also, would love to turn off the nested conversations (I recently had some emails with broad distribution and the conversations are like a wild set of reproducing rabbits) but can’t seem to find that in the settings. In general, except for typing, I find the user experience in Outlook for Android better than it is for Office365 when it comes to pretty simple email tasks. And Outlook 2011 much better for more complicated email tasks than either. But let me give things a chance.

Speed of this machine is tolerable. Actually better than I thought. Then again, I’m sitting 6 inches from the router.

Not really a function of this experiment, but just realized there is apparently no direct way to view Office365 tasks on an Android phone. Even using the web view rather than the app. You can download a separate app, but that sure seems like a pain. Really?

Feb 16

Crap. Can’t use my scanner. Took a picture with my phone and emailed it to myself, but not a very satisfying answer.

Again, more peripheral challenges. I need to print a document out. Tried to use my Epson NX400 printer. Initially got these "instructions":

printer.png

However, following these instructions basically yields a circular chain that doesn’t really go anywhere. NX400 is classified as a “classic” (i.e., computer connected, not web connected) printer), and the directions given for “classic” printers (go to chrome://devices and click the button for “add classic printer”) are fine except there is no actual button for “add classic printer.” Sigh. Going to need to connect my MAC and print this doc out.

I’m not sure what it is, but I find the Office365 search interface annoying.

Feb 17

At the actual office-office today. The wifi is on the fritz, and there is no Ethernet connection on the Chromebook. Back to the MAC for a wired connection. So much for the cloud. Member to file -- for the cloud to work, you need an internet connection. Sigh.

Feb 18

Had to print out pictures of flags from other countries for my wife’s preschool class. For fans of Big Bang, this is their version of “Fun with Flags.” Back to the MAC. Need to figure out this printer thing.

Need to do a minor tweak to a PDF document. Not even sure I want to try this online.  

Feb 22

Had to do some serious Excel number crunching.  Driving me crazy in both Sheets and Excel online.  Off to the MAC.

Feb 23

Some weird quirkiness trying to copy/paste a blog post into a LinkedIn post.  No rhyme or reason to what is showing up when I paste.  Off to the MAC.

Feb 24

A general observation -- watching my own staff, almost every time we have a truly collaborative document that we’re working on -- lots of people, both inside and outside the organization, often with more than one person editing at the same time -- we almost always use Google Docs.  Almost every time we have any heavy lifting with spreadsheets, we use Excel, and never the online version..

Feb 29

True confession.  I’ve been using my MAC for the past 2 days.  It started with a long document that I knew the receiver would HAVE to had in Word format, and I didn’t want to mess with any idiosyncrasies in converting from Google Docs to Word.  But I still stick to my guns that for multi-person collaborative, pre-final work, I almost always defer to Docs.

I will also say that I may have been too hard on Office365.  I was a bit frustrated with the user experience on the Chromebook -- and particularly the speed of the experience -- so I thought I would stick with Office365 during my short MAC sabbatical. The net-net is that I think the processing power on my MAC compared to the 2G Chromebook makes a significant difference in the quality of the user experience. The internet connection is the same, but it is now more satisfying -- not quite, but more comparable to the Outlook experience.

More to come...

-----

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Keynote-Erik-Qualman.jpeg

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Topics: cloud, cloud computing, office365, chromebook

Can @jmancini77 Survive Solely in the #Cloud on a Cheap $192 #Chromebook for 30 Days? - Week One Report

Feb 17, 2016 9:35:11 AM by John Mancini

Feb 9

I like to periodically upset my normal work and personal patterns and try something different for 30 days just to see what I learn from the process. 

So for the next 30 days, here’s my little internal stress test:

Can a real life business executive survive in the cloud on a $192 computer for 30 days?  

OK, it's arguable whether I am a “real life business executive,” but as the lawyers like to say (my wife and I have been binging on Good Wife), let’s stipulate that.  

For the next 30 days, I will try to survive only in the cloud on a Chromebook. More specifically, on a 2G Asus C20 that cost $192. We’ll see. I will log any insurmountable difficulties or problems or observations and report back on a weekly basis.

Feb 10

On my MAC, I love the ctr-alt-4 to take a screenshot of a portion of a screen -- especially useful in presentations. Hmmm...Wonder how I do this on this machine?  OK, here’s how to do it on a Chromebook. Works like a charm.

 

Feb 11

Hmmm...apparently there is no Lync or Skype for Business online. Or am I missing something? Bizarre given all the rest of Office365 services are available online, including some products I’ve never heard of. Sigh. Have Skype for Business on my phone, so I will cover that base there.

Sure can't do the following on a Chromebook. I need to make a movie of old pics for my wife for Valentine’s Day. Back to the MAC for that -- here’s the LINK, BTW! [Note: I’m hoping that Youtube actually sticks to and actually understands their own policies re copyrighted music -- which say if a song is on their list, it’s OK, but the artist can place ads -- seems fair.]  We’ll see if I get a takedown notice.  If I do, you’re liable to see a silent movie.

Feb 12

Day three of using only the Office365 interface for email, calendars, etc. rather than Outlook 2011 for MAC (2011?). This is taking some getting used to. Driving me nuts that you can’t get to calendar directly from the email view (have to click back out to the main screen).  Also, would love to turn off the nested conversations (I recently had some emails with broad distribution and the conversations are like a wild set of reproducing rabbits) but can’t seem to find that in the settings. In general, except for typing, I find the user experience in Outlook for Android better than it is for Office365 when it comes to pretty simple email tasks. And Outlook 2011 much better for more complicated email tasks than either. But let me give things a chance.

Speed of this machine is tolerable. Actually better than I thought. Then again, I’m sitting 6 inches from the router.

Not really a function of this experiment, but just realized there is apparently no direct way to view Office365 tasks on an Android phone. Even using the web view rather than the app. You can download a separate app, but that sure seems like a pain. Really?

Feb 16

Crap. Can’t use my scanner. Took a picture with my phone and emailed it to myself, but not a very satisfying answer.

Again, more peripheral challenges. I need to print a document out. Tried to use my Epson NX400 printer. Initially got these "instructions":

However, following these instructions basically yields a circular chain that doesn’t really go anywhere. NX400 is classified as a “classic” (i.e., computer connected, not web connected) printer), and the directions given for “classic” printers (go to chrome://devices and click the button for “add classic printer”) are fine except there is no actual button for “add classic printer.” Sigh. Going to need to connect my MAC and print this doc out.

I’m not sure what it is, but I find the Office365 search interface annoying.

Feb 17

At the actual office-office today. The wifi is on the fritz, and there is no Ethernet connection on the Chromebook. Back to the MAC for a wired connection. So much for the cloud. Member to file -- for the cloud to work, you need an internet connection. Sigh.

Will report back on further developments next week. Stand by.

-----

Make your plans for AIIM16 before we sell out.  April 26-28 in New Orleans.  It will be a blast.

Register Today

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Topics: cloud, cloud computing, office365, chromebook

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