Google

Welcome to the Digital Landfill

Digital Landfill, blog by AIIM President John Mancini

2015 Prediction No. 5 -- Security Shifts from the Perimeter and the Device to the Asset Itself

Posted by John Mancini

Dec 21, 2014 7:41:00 PM

I'll be pontificating on 2015 over the next few weeks. Actually, I have already started.  Prediction number one was published on the IBM Big Data and Analytics blog. I think there will likely be about 12 -- kind of like the 12 Days of Predictions.  But maybe not; we'll see.  At some point I will need to start actual Christmas shopping.

My running tally of prediction posts so far:

  1. 2015:  The Year of the I in IT (originally published on the IBM blog; will republish at the end)
  2. 2015:  E-mail Becomes Cool Again
  3. 2015:  The Commoditization of File Sync and Share
  4. 2015:  Collaboration Steals the Show from Enterprise Social
  5. 2015:  Security Shifts from the Perimeter and the Device to the Asset Itself

Security Shifts from the Perimeter and the Device to the Asset Itself

 

For most of the past three decades, we have equated information security with securing the perimeter of the organization, and if that failed, securing the devices upon which the information is viewed.

This obviously worked well during the mainframe era into the mini-computer and through the desktop era. Things began to break down during the laptop era, but they have really come apart now in the era of mobility and institutional (and often state-based) hacking.

security leaks

We spend countless -- albeit necessary -- cycles worrying about perimeter and device security.  That won’t go away, but it is no longer enough.  It’s kind of like the fiction of relying on the Maginot Line to keep out the invaders.  Once the invaders went mobile, the jig was up.

Per ThinkProgress.org, “More than 3 million people had their smartphones stolen last year, many of which weren’t sufficiently protected with as much as a simple passcode to keep the phone’s data safe...Consumer Reports found in a recent survey that cell phone thefts more than doubled in 2013. Another 1.4 million phones were lost or never recovered.”

We need to move from perimeter security and device-based security to security linked directly to the information asset itself.  And 2015 is the year organizations will begin to seriously embrace this concept.

-----

We'll be talking about this issue at AIIM15 in San Diego.  We have a special deal going on right now -- we'll be drawing 3 registrations who register before December 25 and we'll pay for their hotel at the Conference.  Join 750 other information leaders for 3 days focused on how to "Embrace the Chaos."

 

Read More

2015 Prediction No. 4 -- Process-Centric Collaboration Steals the Show from Enterprise Social

Posted by John Mancini

Dec 19, 2014 9:35:00 AM

I'll be pontificating on 2015 over the next few weeks. Actually, I have already started.  Prediction number one was published on the IBM Big Data and Analytics blog. I think there will likely be about 12 -- kind of like the 12 Days of Predictions.  But maybe not; we'll see.  At some point I will need to start actual Christmas shopping.

My running tally of prediction posts so far:

  1. 2015:  The Year of the I in IT (originally published on the IBM blog; will republish at the end)
  2. 2015:  E-mail Becomes Cool Again
  3. 2015:  The Commoditization of File Sync and Share
  4. 2015:  Collaboration Steals the Show from Enterprise Social

2015:  Collaboration Steals the Show from Enterprise Social

It seems like the cycle time for the old Gartner hype cycle becomes compressed with each iteration.  It used to take years for a unique technology to ascend the curve, get over the peak, survive the trough, and become a feature of some broader system.

The enterprise social space certainly has had a rapid evolution. New entrants rushed into the enterprise social landrush of the late 2000s.  Conversations about “collaboration” and how to do it more effectively were supplanted by a rush to implement “Facebook for the Enterprise.”  Jive is one good barometer of the peak of the enterprise space.  Jive IPOed in 2011 and its stock soon hit the upper 20s in early 2012.  Yammer is another, peaking in value with its acquisition by Microsoft in July 2012.

Process centric collaboration enterprise social

Since then, we’ve seen a “featurization” of the social space into the offerings of the major platform players that mirrors the changes that are underway in the file sync and share space. We’ve also seen a swing in the collaboration/social pendulum in the direction of collaboration, with a new coat of paint as the “digital workplace.”

A number of developments will take place in 2015 to hasten this pendulum swing:

  1. Per my Email is Cool Again post, a reconstituted people-centric view of email, driven by analytics, will sweep email back into center stage.

  2. As part of this, social streams will be integrated into broader systems with radically personalized email (through analytics) at the hub, and social will become a feature, not a stand alone product.

  3. We will finally get tools that allow collaboration to become more than a series of “reply all” emails with attachments loaded up with that dreadful “track changes” functionality.

  4. Whether you call it Smart Process Applications or some other analyst term, the cool kids on the block will refocus all of this collaboration potential around process-specific applications that involve those gray, knowledge-worker intensive processes that don’t lend themselves to straight through workflow automation.

  5. Ultimately, to paraphrase the political folks in the Clinton Administration, "It's all about processes and customers, stupid."

-----

We'll be talking about this issue at AIIM15 in San Diego.  We have a special deal going on right now -- we'll be drawing 3 registrations who register before December 25 and we'll pay for their hotel at the Conference.  Join 750 other information leaders for 3 days focused on how to "Embrace the Chaos."

 

Read More

2015 Prediction No. 3 -- The Commoditization of File Sync and Share

Posted by John Mancini

Dec 17, 2014 7:40:00 AM

I'll be pontificating on 2015 over the next few weeks. Actually, I have already started.  Prediction number one was published on the IBM Big Data and Analytics blog. I think there will likely be about 12 -- kind of like the 12 Days of Predictions.  But maybe not; we'll see.  At some point I will need to start actual Christmas shopping.

My running tally of prediction posts so far:

  1. 2015:  The Year of the I in IT (originally published on the IBM blog; will republish at the end)
  2. 2015:  E-mail Becomes Cool Again
  3. 2015:  The Commoditization of File Sync and Share

The Commoditization of File Sync and Share

My oh my how things are changing in the File Sync and Share space.

It wasn’t that long ago that Box and Dropbox had the game mostly to themselves.  Box dominated on the enterprise side, and Dropbox on the consumer side.  Existing enterprise solutions were awful on three use cases: 1) allowing content to be shared outside the firewall; 2) allowing content to be viewed on multiple devices; and 3) giving users cost-effective storage options beyond those provided by IT central-casting.  Users flocked to these solutions, much to the consternation and futile resistance of IT managers and lawyers and records managers.

2015 prediction

Well, the game has change. 2015 is the year in which file sync and share ceases to be a viable stand-alone value proposition.  Here are the indicators.

  1. Box itself is focused on becoming the content platform for a new ecosystem of applications and solutions, with file sync and share as a feature, but not the exclusive source of value.  Box has spent the last year adding ECM capabilities to its product, which makes it a viable "good enough" ECM solution for many organizations, especially small and medium-sized business.  Their ultimate value lies in the ecosystem they are working to create, with Box as the content platform, which was the point of many of the presentations at this year’s Boxworks.

  2. The value proposition of relatively cheap and flexible cloud storage available from niche sync and share vendors has evaporated as the big players (Microsoft, Google, Amazon) have waded into the cloud storage game and essentially driven the price points to zero.

  3. As Dropbox uses its scale from the consumer side to become a credible player on the business side, it will suck the air out of a lot of the other stand alone sync and share players. Microsoft cozying up to Dropbox is a fascinating development.

  4. Most of the major ECM players have launched their own versions of sync and share -- or have integrated with Box as their sync and share solution -- and incorporated this into their broader ecosystem of processes and control as a feature.

So for 2015, watch for continued commoditization of this space.  And some interesting acquisitions.

-----

John Mancini is President of the Association for Information and Image Management (http://www.aiim.org), blogs under the title Digital Landfill (http://info.aiim.org/digital-landfill) and can be found on Twitter and LinkedIn as @jmancini77.  And the author of the aforementioned children's Christmas book, which has sold near triple digits over 10 years.

----

We'll be talking about this issue at AIIM15 in San Diego.  We have a special deal going on right now -- we'll be drawing 3 registrations who register before December 25 and we'll pay for their hotel at the Conference.  Join 750 other information leaders for 3 days focused on how to "Embrace the Chaos."

 

Read More

Warning Will Robinson! -- It's 2015 Prediction Time -- E-mail Becomes Cool Again

Posted by John Mancini

Dec 15, 2014 8:15:00 AM

Yes, it's that time again.

No, not just the holiday season (BTW, there are still a few days left to get that ultimate holiday gift, Will's Christmas List, soon to be a major motion picture starring Brad Pitt as me and Anjelina Jolie as my wife.*).  

It's 2015 Prediction Time!

I'll be pontificating on 2015 over the next few weeks. Actually, I have already started.  Prediction number one was published on the IBM Big Data and Analytics blog (thanks, IBM!).  I think there will likely be about 12 -- kind of like the 12 Days of Predictions.  But maybe not; we'll see.  At some point I will need to start actual Christmas shopping.

My running tally of prediction posts so far:

  1. 2015:  The Year of the I in IT (originally published on the IBM blog; will republish at the end)
  2. 2015:  E-mail Becomes Cool Again

Email Becomes Cool Again

We’ve all spent a lot of cycles (including me) talking about the death of email as the central nervous system of our organizations. We’ve all made the same arguments -- as social systems sweep through our organizations and as those pesky millennials come in (well versed in social land), email will be relegated to the dustbin of enterprise systems.

Well, to paraphrase Mark Twain, “the reports of the death of email have been greatly exaggerated.”

There are a lot of signs to me that rather than becoming marginalized, a new and revitalized approach to thinking about email is about to take hold, and 2015 will be the year for this.  Here are a few of the signs, centered around new visions of the user experience, all pointing to an expanded view of email as the center of a broader universe of interactions.

  1. If you haven’t taken a look at Google Inbox, you need to.  Invites are still needed (like in the early days of gmail), but they are not hard to get.  The user experience takes a page out of the “zero inbox” playbook, complete with a nice sunshine screenshot if you get to that zero inbox nirvana. But the point of Google Inbox is this -- take the existing tab-driven auto-categorization of gmail (Work, Promotions, Social, etc.) and map it directly into the user experience.  In addition, the point is to pull notifications related to social interactions in Google+ into the email interface and allow users to review all this stuff in one place.  And of course capturing (and analyzing) all of this information flow allows for Google to deliver those very useful (and at times also somewhat creepy) Google Notes. The good news for users is that Google Inbox makes it very intuitive to quickly review promotional and social emails and dismiss them with one “sweep.” The bad news is for email marketers -- this is your worst nightmare come true.

  2. IBM has also entered into the revolutionized email game with IBM Verse. The concept behind Verse is “email that understands you” and to use analytics to bridge the gap between people and information.  Per Verse, the modern information professional wears many hats during the day. The old one-size fits all view of email is ill-suited to both the volume of information confronting us, and the varying of roles with which we interact with that information.  

  3. Off in Microsoft land, users are struggling with the multiple places in which information might be located -- was that information in Yammer? or in an email? or in SharePoint? or in OneNote?  Microsoft started talking about the “smart social dashboard” back in March under the name Oslo.  Per Geekwire, the idea is a “personalized, searchable dashboard that uses machine learning to present the most relevant information from their documents, messages, internal social networks and other ‘trending’ information.” Add to all this the recent purchase of Acompli by Microsoft, and you get a sense of new integrated user experience with email at its core.

So my point here -- email is cool again.  Email is being used as the center of a revised set of user experiences that have people rather than messages at their core and that uses analytics-driven intelligence to finally put the filters in place that we have been waiting for.  And all the big players are investing beaucoup resources in this.

I think there is also another angle to this renewed commitment to email.  It centers around the major platform war that is underway as the major vendors drive to the cloud, particularly the war between Microsoft and Google.  All the platform vendors are betting their future on the cloud.  At this point in the evolution of the cloud, the vendors are WAY ahead of the user community.  This is especially true at organizations that operate at massive scale, many of which are still trying to digest systems and technologies they started implementing as long as five years ago. Just ask any group of IT executives from Fortune 2000 companies what primary version of SharePoint they are currently running, and you’ll get a sense of this time lag.  

So as organizations think through their cloud strategies, what is the best wedge to get them in the door and committed to a particular cloud platform?  No one wants to spend another dime (or Euro or drachma or any other currency) on any system that is a commodity and does not add competitive advantage, and what’s the obvious enterprise system with which to start?  Email.  

That’s why the stakes as so high in the analytics-driven email user revolution and why email is suddenly cool again.

-----

John Mancini is President of the Association for Information and Image Management (http://www.aiim.org), blogs under the title Digital Landfill (http://info.aiim.org/digital-landfill) and can be found on Twitter and LinkedIn as @jmancini77.  And the author of the aforementioned children's Christmas book, which has sold near triple digits over 10 years.

----

We'll be talking about this issue at AIIM15 in San Diego.  We have a special deal going on right now -- we'll be drawing 3 registrations who register before December 25 and we'll pay for their hotel at the Conference.  Join 750 other information leaders for 3 days focused on how to "Embrace the Chaos."

 

Read More

Coming Attractions -- 2015 Predictions and File Sync and Share Profiles

Posted by John Mancini

Dec 9, 2014 10:03:18 AM

Looking ahead, I'll be doing a couple of blog series over the next few weeks.

One will be my set of 2015 Predictions, which this year seem to be in a particularly disruputive context.  I am reminded of this Lenin quote -- "It is impossible to predict the time and progress of revolution. It is governed by its own more or less mysterious laws."  I would like to say that I am releasing these quotes in a series of posts rather than a single post because there is some methodical SEO-ish or viral-inducing reason for doing so.  The real reason is that while I have the headlines done, I actually have to write an explanation for each, and thus I will be releasing them as I finish them.  With a personal KPI of at least getting them done before 2015 actually begins, because that seems only fair.

The second series will be on the file sync and share space.  I picked that one because there are so many interesting vectors in that space right now.  Is file sync and share becoming commoditized? How so? How are the various players positioning themselves in the face of this dynamic? There are also a lot of newer players in this space that are not very well-known in the AIIM community.  I'll try to help readers get at least a 30,000 foot view on how to differentiate among the various players by asking a core set of questions to each company, and we'll see how things go.  So if you are in this space and would like a quick interview, ping me at jmancini77 [at] gmail.com and I will set something up.

Only 16 shopping days until Christmas for most people. Which means I have 15 days until my shopping begins on Christmas Eve.  If you haven't seen our "I will pay for your hotel room at AIIM15" deal, check it out HERE.

-----

You might be interested in a webinar I'm doing on December 18 focused on this question -- It Takes Leaders and a Community within your Organization to Bring About Change. Will 2015 be the breakout year?  Check it out.

 

Read More

I would like to pay for your hotel at #AIIM15

Posted by John Mancini

Dec 8, 2014 5:20:26 PM

I may not have purchased any family Christmas presents yet -- hey, that's what Christmas Eve shopping is for -- but I did convince our Conference folks to get into the holiday spirit.  

Read More

November Reading List - Top 25 Articles on #InfoChaos, #Cloud and Digital Disruption

Posted by John Mancini

Dec 1, 2014 5:14:57 PM

I track a lot of publications to try and keep up on what is going on in the enterprise IT space. 

(Note: for those interested, Prismatic is a great tool for them, and Evernote a great tool for keeping track of them.)

(Photo source = Ben+Sam)

Here are 25 of my favorite clips for November. Enjoy. 

Let me know if the list is useful; I might put my “greatest hits” list together every month if it is...

  1. File Sharing Challenges Continue to Frustrate Mobile Workers – Information Security Buzz
  2. 77% of Business Planning to Deploy Multiple Clouds Within the Next Year -- Dataconomy
  3. The Changing Face Of IT Strategy -- CIO
  4. Sony Pictures hacked, entire computer system unusable – The Next Web
  5. In a cloud outage, no one can hear you scream -- InfoWorld
  6. Careful what you wish against: Silicon Valley just rolled out a red carpet to government regulation – Pando Daily
  7. Half of CIOs Think Mobile App Development Takes Too Long -- eWeek
  8. Survey: Moving to the Cloud Still Ain’t Easy – Datamation.com
  9. Leading Digital Transformation -- Techcrunch
  10. How to Be the CIO of Tomorrow -- CIO
  11. The Cloud’s Bright Future – Fast Company
  12. Enterprise IT Crosses the Chasm – CIO
  13. 15 Emerging Technologies To Watch Before 2020 Report – Forrester, via Cloudtweaks.com
  14. Top five enterprise technology trends for 2015 – Verizon, via ZDNet
  15. Why CIOs Need to Embrace New Norms of the Hybrid Cloud – CIO
  16. Internet Of Things 'Overhyped,' Say IT Execs – InformationWeek
  17. The changing role of CIO: IT as the next major utility provider – Enterprise News
  18. 5 Numbers That Illustrate the Mind-Bending Size of Amazon's Cloud – Bloomberg
  19. The Next Business Frontier: Networks of Record – The Huffington Post
  20. Cloud Consistency: The US Government Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap – MSPMentor
  21. What Google Knows About You – Tech
  22. What Boomers And Gen Xers Get Wrong About Social Media – Forbes.com
  23. IT Moves to a Utility Model – What’s The Big Data
  24. 'Proximity' is Samsung's equivalent of Apple's iBeacon, coming to a mall near you – Engadget
  25. Being Smart About the Internet of Things – Business 2 Community

-----

You might also be interested in this presentation...

Read More

29 People Who Make AIIM What It Is

Posted by John Mancini

Nov 26, 2014 4:34:00 PM

Among the many things for which I am thankful are the 29 people who make AIIM work.

People are often surprised there are only 29 staff people here at AIIM given that in the course of 12 months these folks...

  • Put on 37 webinars, with an average of 400+ registrations and 200+ attendees each.
  • Convene an international conference with 750+ attendees and awesome keynotes like Brian Solis, Tom Koulopoulos, David Pogue, Guy Kawasaki, Thornton May, Seth Godin, and a host of others.
  • Publish 6 major Industry Watch reports, 26 white papers, 6 Infographics, and 15+ checklists and toolkits.
  • Speak (not just me) at 20+ major industry conferences per year around the world.
  • Support activities in 40+ chapters and in 15+ standards committees.
  • Support 6,000 individual members, 200+ trade members, and 30+ Executive Leadership Council members.
  • Train 2,200+ people per year in how to properly implement content and information management solutions.
  • Organize a 9 city road show that draws 1,500+ attendees across North America and a partner event in the UK.
  • Are the crazy people who organize World Paper Free Day with no budget.
  • Know more about how to market and communicate the strange world of document, content, and records management than any staff I know.
  • And are more knowledgeable about how to leverage marketing automation (we use Hubspot) than companies many, many times larger than AIIM.

Here are the 29 people who do all this.  

They are not perfect, but they are damn good and they work terrifically hard and in a world where a lot of employees just don't care, they do. They really do.  And I appreciate that.

Thank you.

Read More

29 warning signs of Digital Disruption

Posted by John Mancini

Nov 25, 2014 2:25:30 PM

I put together a few thoughts on what "digital disruption" looks like.  Check them out and let me know what you think.  Feel free to share, embed, or re-use.

Read More

Paperless Dilemma No. 6 -- Mash-up Madness

Posted by John Mancini

Nov 20, 2014 9:04:00 AM

The last in my series of six issues relative to getting rid of paper focuses on what I call Mash-up Madness. See also…

  1. Paperless Dilemma No. 1 – Paper Persistence
  2. Paperless Dilemma No. 2 – Legal Limbo
  3. Paperless Dilemma No. 3 – Input Irregularity
  4. Paperless Dilemma No. 4 – Cloud Craziness
  5. Paperless Dilemma No. 5 – Perplexing Processes

The last topic in my series focuses on some of the rather unusual combinations and mash-ups that are being driven by consumerization, the collision of cloud and mobile, and the Internet of Things. This gets beyond just going paperless, but I think it’s important to place our tactical paper reduction initiatives in a broader context.

[We're doing a webinar on all of this on December 10 -- Free -- details HERE.]

For years, those of us in the content management space have made a distinction between unstructured information and structured information (i.e., data).  This has been a comfortable distinction and allowed us to conveniently describe what is “in” our space and what is “something else.”  The problem with this is that these lines are blurring. Users no longer make this distinction, if they ever did.  It’s just data, used in the context of process.  And this mash-up between unstructured and structured information requires a different skill set – one that cuts across the worlds of content and data (like the CIP!).

A second mash-up relates to the collision between the MFP/copier space and content management.  There is still a bias that somehow players from the MFP side of the house are not “real” content management.  But that makes about as much sense as when we said back in 2007 that SharePoint wasn’t “real” ECM.  Perceptive/Lexmark is a good example of the new breed of content management players with roots in the MFP space.  Consider for a moment the acquisitions by Lexmark over the past four years:

Lastly, and coming back to the world of paper, I think we are seeing an increasing mash-up between capture devices and software. Over the next few years, this will accelerate as more and more software power becomes embedded directly in the device – giving us much better opportunity to finally cross the paperless divide. Consider the Fujitsu fi-7180 scanner, which retails for about $1,500.

This scanner includes the following bundled software – “PaperStream IP (TWAIN/ISIS) Driver, Software Operation Panel, Error Recovery Guide, PaperStream Capture, ScanSnap Manager for fi Series, Scan to Microsoft SharePoint (13), ABBYY FineReader for ScanSnap, Scanner Central Admin Agent.”

It also the following embedded image processing software – “Multi-image, Blank page skip, i-DTC, Advanced-DTC, Simplified-DTC, sRGB, Auto color, Deskew cropping, Punch hole removal, Tab cropping, Upper lower separation, Error diffusion, Dither, Moire removal, Image Emphasis, Color cleanup, Dropout color (None, Specified, Color Saturation), Edge repair, Vertical Streaks Reduction.”

[Note:  Before I’m accused of favoritism, this is just for illustration – the same could be said for scanners of any other major manufacturer as well.]

The point is, consider how different the software component of this product is from the value proposition of a scanner as recently as five years ago.  And imagine what this portends for going paperless as the hardware/software mash-up accelerates in the next few years.

So that wraps up my little series on the challenges of going paperless.  Get our new Paper Wars research report HERE. And if you want a little cheat sheet on the issues I’ve discussed in these six posts, here you go…

A recent keynote that I did on the “Six Paperless Dilemmas” can be found HERE.  

[We're doing a webinar on all of this on December 10 -- Free -- details HERE.]

 

Read More

Subscribe to Email Updates

About Digital Landfill

#InformationChaos -- The game has changed.  

Information is the world’s new currency.

Read just about any business publication and you will quickly conclude that how an organization manages its information assets is now just as fundamental a source of competitive differentiation as how it manages its physical assets, its human assets, and its financial assets. Amidst all of this opportunity, organizations are drowning in a sea of content and information. #InformationChaos reigns supreme.

That's the focus of this blog -- and for that matter, of AIIM.  As the President of AIIM, my goal is to help you and your organization survive and thrive in the era of #InformationChaos.  If I can help, contact me at johnmancini@aiim.org.

Posts by Topic

see all
Google