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Digital Landfill, blog by AIIM President John Mancini

A Case Study of a One Size Fits All RIM SharePoint

Posted by John Mancini

Jan 28, 2015 2:00:00 PM

[ This is a guest post from Christine Padilla, Director, ECM, Sunovion Pharmaceuticals. Christine will be sharing Sunovion's experience implementing a one size fits all ECM & RIM solution at The AIIM Conference in San Diego. ]

Hello All - I'm excited to be speaking about our RIM/Sharepoint implementation in March. Let me give you a little taste of what Renee (RIM Director) and I will be presenting at the conference.

 AIIM15-EB-Banner

While I've been in the industry for over 15 years that last 5 years of working on Records Information Management (RIM) at Sunovion have been my first experience with this program. I say "program" because that is what RIM is -it never ends like a project - but continues on and on and reaches deep within a company - impacting every employee as trusted custodians and many departments such as IT and Legal.

Over the course of these past 5 years our program has had many stops and starts as we lost and gained executive sponsorship, changed strategic direction and evaluated technology options. But all along we have known that perfect couldn't get in the way of progress. We have used that approach to get our company two-thirds of the way to a complete implementation of the RIM lifecycle - classification, declaration, legal hold, expiration, disposition and finally deletion. Legal hold, while in the middle of the lifecycle, is our current and last focus - with the other pieces in place and/or fully tested just waiting to be implemented. We've made gotten this far on a small budget with limited resources. Both Renee (RIM Director) and I were a team of 1 when we started and we are each a team of 2 now - still small when it comes to supporting a company of over 800 employees, more than 500 collaboration sites and 25 years worth of content on file servers. We knew we had to leverage the technology we had - SharePoint - to the expertise we had in-house for RIM - to create a solution that would be accepted by the employees, meet the business requirements and be supportable by IT.

So maybe this strikes a chord with you - limited resources, small budget, lots of content to manage but potential to make a big impact on the organization. Let me know what questions you might have - See you in March.

[ Thanks for reading! See Christina and many other wonderful speakers March 18-20 at The AIIM Conference 2015 in San Diego. ]

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Topics: ecm, aiim conference, sharepoint

Oil & Gas: The Move From Documents to Data

Posted by John Mancini

Jan 28, 2015 11:00:00 AM

[ This is a guest post from Neale Stidolph, Head of Information Management, Lockheed Martin UK. Neale will be speaking at The AIIM Conference in San Diego on Information Management in the Oil & Gas Industry. ]

People often seem to think oil & gas companies are leading-edge and have enough money to invest in whatever systems they like, and that they live in a World of 3D models, data and analytics. The real picture is often very different. Exploration and production companies, who search for and extract hydrocarbons, see information systems and information management as something necessary but not something that excites the interest of the board. Data is certainly much in evidence, but information overall is not treated as ‘the new oil’ by the industry. Much of the focus on data is within the geoscience discipline, from the creation of seismic surveys to reservoir modelling and interpretation. The techniques have changed a bit, but mostly we see increases in resolution, frequency and speed of analysis. This clearly improves the odds of making a discovery and reduces the financial risks of drilling.

Engineering is the domain where there are pockets of data and certainly plenty of systems and methods that could help, but it isn’t working very well for many businesses. Most oil companies do not achieve data-centric engineering and do not practice engineering lifecycle management, though they may believe their engineering contractor does this form them. Records, drawings, specifications, datasheets and other documents are variously controlled, uncontrolled, lost, out of date, duplicated, rendered and generally not in an acceptable condition or one that can be used to advantage. The data is there, data which could provide for faster, less risky and cheaper engineering projects. It is not readily available in the right form, cannot always be trusted and spans incompatible systems often involving several firms in the oil supply chain, with inconsistent or missing metadata.

Value is being eroded or destroyed and opportunities are being missed. In most other sectors that would be game-over, and tragically in some cases we see fatal consequences. Why does it persist in oil? Because the industry has been profitable enough to be inefficient and just works around the problems.

So, what’s the issue? Nothing stays the same and what worked in one era may not work in another. The current oil & gas business environment is very challenging. It is tough enough finding and exploiting reserves, be it oil sands, fracking, high-pressure / high-temperature, deep water and often unstable geopolitics. Add to that the problems of huge swings in oil price, fast-rising costs and falling production volumes in mature provinces and you have a perfect storm.

The sector is challenging with huge projects and lots of legacy information changing hands over the life of assets. The digital age is suffering from rising information chaos, scale of growth and pace of change. A documents and records approach is only partially working and does not support easy use of underlying data. Data is the key to analytics and better decision making. This will be the future as resources diminish, risks rise and returns fall.

1. Tackling legacy information
Oil feels like a modern industry but it is one that has existed through a time of great technological change. We have gone from drawings made with pen and paper, to primitive CAD systems, smarter systems with 3D capability and engineering data warehouses. Many firms are holding information spanning these technical generations, archives of paper, microfiche, scanned image files and a range of electronic files or tape media some of which were made by systems that no longer exist, so can’t be easily opened or converted. Value still exists but you have to know where to look and how to do it. Legacy projects can take many years and be very labor intensive and that will not suit the board.

If you are in a firm that acquires an oil field from another firm you should expect a very large and diverse range of information and are unlikely to be given much guidance or structure. That presents a major risk. This first phase is about discovery, what do you have, in what forms and what are the areas of greatest value?

2. Mining data from documents
Once there is an appreciation of what documents or drawings to target it is time to get tactical and deploy appropriate techniques that will make them more useful. Common safety-critical documents include piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&IDs), isometrics, and line lists. If you are working with a scan you can use OCR, but it isn’t easy to do well, you may need to have it re-drawn or at least manually checked by someone with appropriate engineering or document control skills. That takes time and money.

You will also need to validate if the drawing version control is correct as drawings are often marked up for changes but never re-mastered or ‘as-built’, sitting in backlogs that can last years. You will also need to look at current processes to make sure appropriate data capture exists for new drawings, otherwise your legacy stack will just increase. What we are looking to do is relate engineering objects, such as a pump with a tag number, to drawings and other documents. We would also then like to know what class of pump it is, details of its technical and physical features and have the ability to link all that to a maintenance plan and spare parts inventory. This will all support safety cases and ultimately the license to operate. Poor asset lifecycle management will lead to issues such as poor handover from projects to operations, where gaps in information will cause delays, extra costs and inefficiency. We must remove the problems that are leading to duplicated effort and costs.

3. Using data analytically
This is where the action is, where we get the real returns for all our efforts. Much of the labor of information management is about governance, or in other words building a stable foundation for our information. That is a tough and thankless task. Many fall short of even this level of maturity. It is not a popular line to pursue for the CIO, he won’t be making friends. So, we answer it with analytics. Show the business the money to be saved, risks avoided and improved decision making. From the previous example of our pump, analytics can ingest all forms of information concerning this single item. We can use inspection reports (free text), maintenance systems (database), sensor readings (real-time data), images and more. What do we get? Historical analysis and future prediction. We could just replace that pump after a number of hours use as per manufacturer guidelines, but what we really want to do is know exactly how it is performing, how best to manage it and the most cost-effective yet safe way of proceeding. The benefit across an oil business may result in a few percent savings in operations and maintenance. Sounds small? Given that this is often the largest area of expenditure for the business the savings can be very large indeed. One day of lost production can cost millions of dollars. Skilful information management can play a leading role in improving production efficiency and delivering competitive advantage. It all hinges on digging into the data and being smart.

My AIIM 2015 presentation will cover the range of points made in this blog and provide some practical suggestions on solving them.

[ Thanks for reading! See Neale and many other wonderful speakers March 18-20 at The AIIM Conference 2015 in San Diego. ]

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Topics: change management, aiim conference, information chaos

Data Privacy Day (#DPD15) is a Good Time to Think About #ECM and the #Cloud

Posted by John Mancini

Jan 27, 2015 5:00:00 PM

Data Privacy Day began in the United States and Canada in January 2008 as an extension of the Data Protection Day celebration in Europe. Data Protection Day commemorates the January 28, 1981, signing of Convention 108, the first legally binding international treaty dealing with privacy and data protection. Data Privacy Day is now a celebration for everyone, observed annually on January 28.

One aspect of the complicated set of Data Privacy issues facing companies and individuals that AIIM has focused on has been the implication of pending European Data Protection Regulations as they relate to the storage and management of content in the Cloud.  The AIIM publication is the most comprehensive view I know of European laws and regulations related to the Cloud.

The purpose of the pending European General Data Privacy Regulation (GDPR) is to provide a single law for data protection to cover the whole of the EU rather than the present Directive, which has been implemented differently in each member state.

As a Regulation, rather than a Directive there will be one single set of rules regarding data protection, individual countries will not have the freedom to make choices. As soon as the regulation is passed, each of its provisions will become part of the national legal system of each EEA Member State, “as is.”

The GDPR will thus make it easier for both European and non-European companies to comply with data protection requirements. In addition to giving a common approach to privacy, unlike the existing Directive it covers both cloud computing and social media, and provides common levels of fines for breaches. The GDPR will establish a European Data Protection Board (EDPB) to oversee the administration of the Regulation across the EU.

The final details of the GDPR are still under discussion. Per the Association of Corporate Counsel, “Jean-Claude Juncker, the incoming President of the European Commission, has said that the Regulation should be finalised in the first quarter of 2015. Whilst this is a positive emphasis on finalizing the data protection reforms, given the lengthy European Parliamentary process and the matters which remain outstanding, it seems more likely that the Regulation will be finalised at some point in late 2015 or in 2016. The Regulation will be effective two years after it has been finalised and adopted by the European Parliament.”

What Does the New GDRR Directive Mean for Organizations?

As proposed, organizations will have to:

  1. Collect explicit consent to collect data from data subjects (the data subjects must ‘opt-in’) and facilitate the subject’s wish to withdraw that consent.
  2. Be able to delete all customer data at the request of the data subject, a provision known as “Right to Erasure,” unless there is a legitimate reason for its retention.
  3. Provide data subjects with a clear privacy policy.
  4. On request, provide data subjects with a copy of their personal data in a format that can be transmitted electronically to another system.
  5. Undertake an annual risk management/analysis, detailing both the risks identified for data breach/loss and steps taken to alleviate those risks.
  6. Establish which is to be the Single Data Protection Authority (DPA) for the organization. This may be in any member state. (It is expected that The UK and Ireland will be most popular because of the use of English language).
  7. Appoint a lead authority Data Controller to be responsible for all processing operations across Europe.
  8. For public bodies and organizations processing more than 5,000 data subjects, appoint a Data Protection Officer within 12 months of the Regulation being adopted.
  9. Document fully any breach, and notify the appropriate authority ‘without undue delay.’ It is expected that the authority will decide whether the organization should notify data subjects if any ‘adverse impact’ has been determined.
  10. It is also proposed that the data controller and data processor (the cloud provider) have joint liability for any breach.

AIIM Cloud Data Privacy Recommendations for Data Controllers and Processors

Until the implementation of the Regulation, data controllers and their organisations using, or intending to use cloud services need to:

  1. Be aware of the respective countries within the EU that the personal data of data subjects originates from.
  2. Follow the current legislation, in particular with specific regard to transfer of such personal data across borders.
  3. Establish whether any existing processing falls foul of current legislation and work with the respective Data Protection Authorities to resolve the problems.
  4. Review contracts with existing data processors to ensure that they are compliant with current legislation.
  5. Set a compliant strategy in each geography to reflect the requirements of the new GDPR Regulation before the end of the transition period (currently 2017).
  6. Establish procedures and start the process of gaining explicit consent for the collection and processing of personal data in preparation for the implementation of the Regulation.

 Data processors providing cloud services need to:

  1. Review the physical locations of their data centers and ensure that they are not currently processing personal data outside the boundaries set by individual country legislation.
  2. Decide whether to establish data centers within the EU/EEA or other areas with adequate levels of protection in preparation for the Regulation.
  3. Set a compliant strategy for the company, and in each geography, in preparation for the requirements of the Regulation.
  4. Educate sales and technical staff on the implications of the Regulations, and amend contracts and provisioning appropriately.

Data Privacy Day is a good time to start thinking strategically about these issues.  The AIIM white paper, Making sense of European Data Protection Regulations as they relate to the storage and management of content in the Cloud, is free. Download a copy today and get started.

Download free Data Privacy white paper.

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And if you haven’t yet downloaded a copy of our new e-book, Are You Prepared for Digital Transformation?, check it out. It’s also free.

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Change Management: From Chaos to Transformation

Posted by John Mancini

Jan 27, 2015 3:58:32 PM

[ This is a guest post from Laurie Fischer from the Huron Consulting Group. Laurie will be speaking at The AIIM Conference in San Diego on Change Management. ]

Change permeates and envelopes us, and is the one constant in our lives.  Think of all the workplace changes in just the past few years related to how we create, use, share, retain and dispose of information.  Our ever-increasing need to collaborate and communicate, to analyze and innovate, and to “be mobile” has led to sometimes massive change to existing technologies as well as new solutions that enable us to attain our objectives.

Since change is inevitable, then why is the lack of managing that change the number one reason technology projects fail?  The oldest and strongest emotion in mankind is fear, with fear of the unknown topping the list.  So perhaps it is fear of the unknown that is behind the failure to adopt, accept and enable change.

Often, change management efforts focus on process changes, and training employees on those revised processes required by the implementation of new technologies. There is so much more to change management, however, than a training plan and a communication protocol.  Where change management is really needed is on the “people side” of change.  What are some obvious signs of employee resistance to change?

  • Decline in productivity as employees feel de-motivated
  • Key employees get frustrated and quit
  • Work-around’s (often very creative!) escalate
  • A culture of failure grows and employees ask themselves “why bother?”
  • Deterioration in morale and employees spend a lot of time sharing in the misery
  • A mistrust of management and leadership due to a lack of transparency and availability
  • Employees proactively try to sabotage the system

Let’s look at the other side of the coin now, where change is embraced and integrated. The impact to the bottom line can be significant. Adapting to change (and doing so quickly) in response to marketplace needs or technology innovation can result in a competitive advantage, increased market share and profits.  Organizations that refuse to change get left behind.

Of course, not all change management efforts are the same.  The magnitude of the change (type, scope, size, number of employees affected, etc.), the potential resistance, and a vision of what the change will look like are all significant factors in determining the complexity of a change management strategy.  An initial impact analysis will help define the capacity for change.  However, if there is one key critical success factor to all change management initiatives, it is the clear demonstration of leadership support. Is there a leadership team that is accountable for the success of the change?  Do leaders invest their personal time and attention to following through on actions related to the change?

Come join me at AIIM where, straight from the trenches, I will share real life examples of successful change management efforts as well as epic failures.  We’ll investigate the winning formula for successful integration of change into the organization – whether it’s a change in information management roles and responsibilities, process and procedures and / or technology.  Incorporating key change management principles will increase the success of change management initiatives by applying a structured framework of methods, tools and processes, to manage the change from current to future state, and realize real ROI.

[ Thanks for reading! See Laurie and many other wonderful speakers March 18-20 at The AIIM Conference 2015 in San Diego. ]

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Topics: change management, aiim conference, information chaos

14 posts from #AIIM15 Sponsors on how to Embrace the Chaos

Posted by John Mancini

Jan 26, 2015 4:00:00 PM

This is the full list of interviews with some of the sponsors at AIIM15.

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That's just the sponsors -- here is the actual speaker list - HERE.

Have you download our free e-book companion to AIIM15 -- Are You Prepared for Digital Disruption?

Get Your Free Digital Disruption E-Book!

Early Bird Pricing for AIIM15 ends January 31 -- Don't Miss It!

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How do you engage the customer on THEIR terms? - @ABBYY_USA

Posted by John Mancini

Jan 23, 2015 4:21:00 PM

(Note:  This is part of a longer series of interviews with some of the sponsors at AIIM15, many of whom will be running interactive roundtables at the event.  NOT presentations, but facilitating actual conversations -- imagine that!)

The actual speaker list, including keynotes, is HERE.

So far in the series of sponsor interviews.

How Do You Engage the Customer on THEIR Terms?

Bruce Orcutt is with ABBYY Software.

JM:  What are the three biggest challenges you see your customers facing while trying to "Embrace the Chaos?"

BO:  Here are the key challenges we hear from our customers:

  1. Meeting Customer Expectations -- How customers engage your business or your agency is being defined by their current expectations for what they can achieve with their mobile device. Customers have a "now" or "immediate" expectation that your processes and services will be exposed to them in a direct and meaningful way. As companies "Embrace the Chaos" they need strategies that can engage the customer on their terms via their preferred channel. 
  2. Self-Service -- With customers being even more empowered to engage with you via any channel they demand the visibility and transparency required to manage their own transaction end to end. They are willing participants, but now your services and processes have to be automated and presented in a meaningful way that will enable your customers to achieve their goals. 
  3. Real-Time  -- Gone are the days where someone submits something and patiently waits days or weeks for a reply, status or update. Business and customer engagement is a real-time experience. That means all of your services and processes need to be optimized to give context and response to your customers in real-time. I submit my ID and I receive a quote, I provide my repair order and my claim is paid, I provide my utility bill and my account is open.

JM:  What do you see as the three most important trends related to Information Management facing organizations over the next 18-24 months? What will be different in our industry two years from now?

BO:  Here's what will be different:

  1. Understanding Context -- Processes and procedures are driven by documents and enterprises and agencies are being overwhelmed with the amount of content provided to them by customers, partners, and suppliers. Organizations that are able to understand this content and extract meaningful context will have competitive advantage as they are able to accelerate transactions, understand more about their customers, ensure better compliance, and generate additional revenue opportunities. It is no longer about finding and reading an account number. The future opportunity is about understanding all the context on the document and delivering meaningful data to the process and decision engines for better customer outcomes.

  2. Multi-Channel -- Engaging customers, agents and brokers via mobile, web, email, fax, scanner, multi-function printer, or embedded camera is an important industry trend. Not only is the channel of engagement important, but many times customers will start in one channel and finish in a second. This is why advanced platforms that support all primary engagement channels will be very important going forward. 

  3. Data -- The ability for enterprises to capture more data from customer provided documents will drive new use cases, opportunities for automation and significantly reduce the costs of transactions.

JM:  What are the three most important things AIIM15 attendees should know about your company?

BO:  

First, ABBYY has the most advanced and sophisticated text recognition products in the market. This technology is delivered via desktop, server, hosted service, and cloud based solutions in addition to developer SDKs. 

In addition, ABBYY technology does not stop at text recognition, we also offer a robust platform for data extraction, validation and delivery enabling companies the ability to capture more information from every customer interaction via any channel.

Lastly, ABBYY text analytics and discovery technologies are improving the categorization and context delivery of content while providing additional insights related to compliance, e-Discovery and information governance.

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Have you download our free e-book companion to AIIM15 -- Are You Prepared for Digital Disruption?

Get Your Free Digital Disruption E-Book!

Early Bird Pricing for AIIM15 ends January 31 -- Don't Miss It!

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Reengineer Your Content Process - Or Fail -- @quarkxpress

Posted by John Mancini

Jan 23, 2015 2:30:00 PM

(Note:  This is part of a longer series of interviews with some of the sponsors at AIIM15, many of whom will be running interactive roundtables at the event.  NOT presentations, but facilitating actual conversations -- imagine that!)

The actual speaker list, including keynotes, is HERE.

So far in the series of sponsor interviews.

Reengineer Your Content Process -- Or Fail

Dave White is Chief Technology Officer at Quark.

JM:  What are the three biggest challenges you see your customers facing while trying to "Embrace the Chaos?"

DW:  Enterprises in industries such as financial services and manufacturing are evaluating their multi-channel customer communications requirements and their related internal publishing processes and technology. Companies know they must change, but truly struggle with:

  1. Prioritizing their business¹s urgent demand to deliver customer communications in the richest experiences across the broadest selection of devices and formats at the lowest cost with the more complex and ­ initially ­ costly need to re-engineer business processes to accomplish those communication goals efficiently now and for the future.
  2. Identifying the minimal number of vendors and solutions ­ through all the marketing noise ­that can truly address their current needs as well as offer flexibility to address the very rapidly changing content technology landscape.
  3. Identifying internally or hiring the right personnel or consultants who can lead a team responsible for the customer communications department through a successful transformation because the new world requires much broader and deeper technology understanding than most publishing teams have traditionally been required to have.

 

JM:  What do you see as the three most important trends related to Information Management facing organizations over the next 18-24 months? What will be different in our industry two years from now?

DW:  Here are the issues we see impacting end user organizations:

  1. Brand will become even more critical to organizations as they differentiate customer experience. Brand and content will be even more inseparable. One of Information Management¹s driving purposes today is to efficiently support digital content delivery where the dramatic fragmentation of consumption devices continues to increase. Businesses are often selecting the lowest cost but broadest reach systems, but this often equates to content delivery with the lowest functionality and business control ­ as is seen with many responsive design implementations. We¹re currently in a cycle that is led by breadth at the cost of richness, but we are seeing signs that businesses are identifying that they need more control and flexibility related to brand in terms of styling, design, layout, and interactivity in order to deliver an optimized customer experience on every device and media type.
  2. Many companies are struggling with the need for content and document management that actually understands content ­not just files, file associated metadata, and file driven workflows. Content management needs to become more comprehensive and include deep connection and real-time integration to the authoring, re-use, design, and multi-channel publishing processes. Too many enterprise content management implementations have stopped at supporting centralized file stores with workflow or have just become systems of record.
  3. Capturing knowledge with semantic richness and granular metadata directly from subject matter experts such as financial analysts, product managers, and technical staff in a form that can be reused, repurposed, and automatically published is critical to remove the manual labor and time-intensive publishing processes of old. Supporting that authoring process across a breath of devices and with content specific capabilities such as direct integration of data components including tables and charts ­ versus the traditional copy/recreate/redesign steps ­ will shorten time to market and deliver better content consumption experiences.

JM:  What are the three most important things AIIM15 attendees should know about your company?

DW:  

We have a deep understanding and extensive global experience in helping large organizations change from traditional publishing processes to dynamic publishing solutions that reduce time and costs by up to 85%. Organizations such as Standard and Poor¹s, National Bank of Canada, HSBC, UNICEF, IBM, Louis Vuitton and many more rely on our solutions daily to continue to transform their businesses.

Secondly, Quark is one of the only vendors in the market with an end-to-end solution from structured content authoring (using MS Word or any modern Web browser), review and approvals and content management through to multi-channel output for print, PDF, Web, eBooks, and interactive mobile apps. Our technology is commonly deployed alongside leading enterprise content management platforms such as FileNet and Documentum.

Lastly, dynamic publishing covers a wide array of areas, so whether you are looking to automate multi-channel publishing, better manage compliance documents or standard operating procedures, deliver interactive sales materials securely to a distributed sales team, create compelling interactive apps, or take government regulatory processes online, dynamic publishing is widely applicable and Quark has a range of solutions to meet your needs.

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Have you download our free e-book companion to AIIM15 -- Are You Prepared for Digital Disruption?

Get Your Free Digital Disruption E-Book!

Early Bird Pricing for AIIM15 ends January 31 -- Don't Miss It!

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Document solutions using the software that is already there - @macroviewtweets

Posted by John Mancini

Jan 23, 2015 1:03:00 PM

(Note:  This is part of a longer series of interviews with some of the sponsors at AIIM15, many of whom will be running interactive roundtables at the event.  NOT presentations, but facilitating actual conversations -- imagine that!)

The actual speaker list, including keynotes, is HERE.

So far in the series of sponsor interviews.

Document Solutions Using the Software that is Already There

Noel Williams is with MacroView.

JM:  What are the three biggest challenges you see your customers facing while trying to "Embrace the Chaos?"

NW:  1) Use SharePoint behind the scenes, but allow users to continue working in familiar rich-client applications, particularly Microsoft Office; 2) Gain economies of scale via global deployment, but ensure adoption by accommodating local requirements and language; 3) Gathering meaningful usage metrics, to enable effective refinement based on actual usage patterns.

JM:  What do you see as the three most important trends related to Information Management facing organizations over the next 18-24 months? What will be different in our industry two years from now?

NW:  1) The current plethora of Cloud offerings will rationalize down to a few big players; 2) Globalization - an unstoppable trend that has major impacts on design and deployment of Information Management solutions; 3) Constant driving down of operational costs - accomplish more with fewer people and less cost.

JM:  What are the three most important things AIIM15 attendees should know about your company?

NW:  1) MacroView is about document solutions using the software that business prefers - Microsoft Office and SharePoint; 2) Our solutions are designed to cope with volume and to be extensible / customizable to handle sophisticated requirements in the areas of document generation, document management and email management; 3) The MacroView customer base extends worldwide, across diverse industry sectors including financial services, legal, engineering / construction, energy and government.

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Have you download our free e-book companion to AIIM15 -- Are You Prepared for Digital Disruption?

Get Your Free Digital Disruption E-Book!

Early Bird Pricing for AIIM15 ends January 31 -- Don't Miss It!

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Dealing with the double-edge sword of security and access - @searchtechcorp

Posted by John Mancini

Jan 23, 2015 9:39:00 AM

(Note:  This is part of a longer series of interviews with some of the sponsors at AIIM15, many of whom will be running interactive roundtables at the event.  NOT presentations, but facilitating actual conversations -- imagine that!)

The actual speaker list, including keynotes, is HERE.

So far in the series of sponsor interviews.

Dealing with the Double-Edged Sword of Security and Access

Graham Gillen is a Vice President at Search Technologies.

JM:  What are the three biggest challenges you see your customers facing while trying to "Embrace the Chaos?"

GG:  We see three challenges related to a common theme - recruiting talent to deal with and understand:

  1. How do you deal with data security issues and prepare for cyberattacks?
  2. How do you best leverage analytics and machine learning for automated business insight?
  3. What are the best technologies and architectures for information management to ensure performance for increasingly demanding applications and users?

JM:  What do you see as the three most important trends related to Information Management facing organizations over the next 18-24 months? What will be different in our industry two years from now?

GG:  Here are some of our thoughts on the most important trends and what will be different in the industry two years from now.

  1. Re-platforming to the cloud, and a standardization (and dumbing down) of the functionality available to information workers. The move to the Cloud is primarily cost-driven - not something that information workers have asked for.
  2. Heightened concerns about information security (as found in the recent AIIM survey), exacerbated by high profile hacking news stories.
  3. Proliferation of devices and platforms. More information, living in more places, and accessible in more ways.

In two years, successful enterprises will be those who correctly handle the double edged sword of information security and demand for ubiquitous accessibility.

JM:  What are the three most important things AIIM15 attendees should know about your company?

GG:  1) We are a small company, but probably the largest IT services company (170 people) focused exclusively on search and big data applications and technologies. 2) We have conducted over 600 successful projects in e-commerce, media & publishing, professional staffing, manufacturing, and government sector. 3) In 2015, we will be celebrating 10 years of steady growth and profitability.

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Have you download our free e-book companion to AIIM15 -- Are You Prepared for Digital Disruption?

Get Your Free Digital Disruption E-Book!

Early Bird Pricing for AIIM15 ends January 31 -- Don't Miss It!

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What's In Your #ECM and #ERM System? - @nuix

Posted by John Mancini

Jan 22, 2015 6:08:00 PM

(Note:  This is part of a longer series of interviews with some of the sponsors at AIIM15, many of whom will be running interactive roundtables at the event.  NOT presentations, but facilitating actual conversations -- imagine that!)

The actual speaker list, including keynotes, is HERE.

So far in the series of sponsor interviews.

What's in Your ECRM System?

Brian Tuemmler is an Information Governance Program Architect with Nuix.

JM:  How do you see the value that Information Governance can deliver to organizations?

BT:  A popular topic of discussion among the community of information professionals is what information governance (IG) can do for your records and information management program.  (I recently wrote about this in a blog post, “Five Ways to Accelerate Your Records and Information Management Program.”) IG tools that provide Information Transparency™ into your dark data can help you solve known problems and a bunch of new problems you didn’t know you could fix.  IG can also help you with enterprise content and records management (ECM or ECRM) systems in ways you probably didn’t know were possible.

JM:  What has gone wrong with ECM along the way?

BT:  A recent blog from “Info Gov Guerrilla” Christian Walker, called “ECM Isn’t Delivering," explores some of the shortcomings about ECM systems and implementations.  Walker writes, “The stuff I want to see is still the exception; getting value out of information and solving business problems.”  

I have been an ECM consultant for a large portion of my career and I would mostly agree that ECM has not delivered these high-level benefits for many companies.  It has succeeded, however, where the perceived benefits of greater control outweighed the expected costs of getting the content into a repository. The problem is that most of your content doesn’t rise to this level.

As Chris wrote, “If an organization doesn’t have the processes and will to get their information under control and leverage it, spending butt-loads on software will get them nowhere.”

JM:  What does Nuix do to address this problem?

BT:  As it turns out, companies are figuring out interesting and innovative new solutions for this problem using Nuix. Nuix is not an ECM solution (nor are we consultants), but our customers are breathing more value into the ECRM space.

As a bit of background, Nuix will crawl though your shared drives, email systems, SharePoint sites, Notes databases, and other collections to build an inventory of what is there, so you can go explore and act upon what you find.  Once you have this ability, you can suddenly use that information to grow—and measure—your success with ECM in some pretty clever ways.

There are two ways to get more content into an ECM:

  • Increase the value of the data you migrate
  • Lower the cost of migration.

You can achieve both by eliminating from consideration any content that will not benefit from ECM.  One manufacturing company is using Nuix to cull out non-records, non-content, non-collaborative, un-secure, and non-capturable content before users ever get involved.   The company is then tagging the remaining, relatively more valuable content with metadata to increase its usability in the new ECRM.   In other words, don’t assume you need to move everything to the ECRM; be selective, but maximize your value.

ECRM is not a successful technology until it has content.  People want to know if they are maximizing their investments, and the evidence for that resides in the existing unstructured content.  Nuix can help you establish value, prepare ECRM strategies, and assist with migration as part of a larger IG program. 

JM:  Can you give me some examples?

BT:  A large financial institution has been using a records classification team to classify content when moving it into an ECRM. The company asked Nuix to help judge the success and accuracy of that classification.  In short, the records team want to know what has been classified, what was misclassified, and if they are improving with training. In general, I would argue that the machine should do the classification and humans the validation, but this is an interesting way to judge the value of their effort.

A large construction manufacturer wanted to benchmark its progress in migrating content to the ECRM system.  The migration team wants to generate a quarterly trend report to department heads.  They know that migration occurs but want the business metrics to show how well. In other words, “We know what to do; we just don’t know how well we are doing it!”

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About Digital Landfill

#InformationChaos -- The game has changed.  

Information is the world’s new currency.

Read just about any business publication and you will quickly conclude that how an organization manages its information assets is now just as fundamental a source of competitive differentiation as how it manages its physical assets, its human assets, and its financial assets. Amidst all of this opportunity, organizations are drowning in a sea of content and information. #InformationChaos reigns supreme.

That's the focus of this blog -- and for that matter, of AIIM.  As the President of AIIM, my goal is to help you and your organization survive and thrive in the era of #InformationChaos.  If I can help, contact me at johnmancini@aiim.org.

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