AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

Why the CIP is Not Just for Information Pros: An Accountant's Story

Jul 20, 2017 10:16:00 AM by Felicia Dillard

When asked what the CIP means to me, I immediately smile. This accomplishment means a lot - both on a professional and personal level.

You must be wondering  - how did an accountant become a Certified Information Professional?

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Topics: cip, certified information professional, accounts payable, accounting

[Working Lunch Series] Elevating Content to Make the Unknown Known

Jul 19, 2017 1:09:00 PM by John Mancini

Last week we kicked off our "Working Lunch Blog Series" with a great session on Changing Times: The Future of ECM. This week, we're pleased to present you with our second installment of the series. For those who are new to the Working Lunch series, the idea here is simple - every Wednesday for the next couple of weeks we'll post a video of one of our most popular sessions from The AIIM Conference 2017. Grab a bite to eat and enjoy an educational video during your lunch hour! Or make it social and invite the whole staff to watch!

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Topics: content management, enterprise content management, ecm, intelligent information management

11 Things You Need to Know About Uncontrolled Information

Jul 18, 2017 10:47:00 AM by John Mancini

The reality for many organizations is that uncontrolled information – and especially paper -- still has a stranglehold on day-to-day activities. Many tasks requiring review and approval still require physical interactions with paper-based information. There is clearly room and opportunity for business organizations to maximize their information use and value as well as lower operating costs by removing paper from their business processes. 

Information capture is the first step in being paper-free, whether it is digitizing paper using scanners, or capturing digitally created information immediately and maintaining it in digital form. 

Consider the following 11 data points from AIIM research pointing to the challenges associated with managing unstructured information:

  1. 65% of organizations say they are still “signing” on paper.
  2. Paper is still with us despite everything - only 43% of organizations say paper is decreasing in their organizations.
  3. The human factor is still the primary reason for paper use for handling, reading, and note taking (47%), along with lack of a management plan to move away from paper (47%).
  4. 39% of organizations say they lack understanding and awareness when it comes to paper-free options.
  5. 66% of organizations report rising numbers of digital inbound documents.
  6. 38% of organizations say that they now receive more digital invoices than those in paper form.
  7. When it comes to converting key business processes, Accounts Payables (AP) is the top priority for 30% of organizations.
  8. 36% of organizations say they have a combination of paper and digital content in the same workflows.
  9. 43% of organizations say removal of paper from processes should be a constant objective.
  10. Key benefits identified in gaining control of uncontrolled information are faster customer response (50%) and higher productivity (42%).
  11. 45% of organizations report payback of their information capture investments in less than 6 months.

Interested in finding out more? Check out this new Tip Sheet, Understanding the “Three” Root Causes of Process Inefficiency.

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Topics: content management, ecm, scanning, capture, digital transformation,, information capture

Guest Post - Artificial Intelligence: Huge Opportunity or the Zombie Apocalypse?

Jul 17, 2017 10:26:00 AM by Greg Council and Rebecca Rowe

What worries us most is often not what actually gets us—that is, causes us our biggest problems. The enormous human capacity for worry can result in productive focus and taking action. Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) inspires our imaginations, invokes our worst nightmares and touches our deepest fears. Near-term, it threatens to take away our jobs and leave us with no way to feed our families.

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Topics: data, analytics, automation, AI, Artificial Intelligence

Guest Post - GDPR and Cross Border Data Flows between the EU and the US: Current State of the Law

Jul 14, 2017 9:14:00 AM by Andrew Pery

This is the fourth post in a series on privacy by Andrew Pery. You might also be interested in Privacy by Design: The Intersection of Law and Technology and What Do the GDPR and new Privacy Laws Mean for U.S. Companies? and Balancing Privacy Rights with Social Utility in the Age of the Internet of Things.

As a direct response to the Snowden revelations relating to the bulk collection of personal data by US intelligence the European Commission and the US Department of Commerce jointly developed a new framework purporting to considerably strengthen the protection of privacy rights of EU citizen data when such data is transferred to US data processors and controllers.  The previous regime under the Safe Harbor was invalidated by the European Court of Justice in Schrems v. Data Protection Authority which held that EU citizen’s privacy rights are at risk given the broad overreach by US public authorities.

Restoring certainly in trans-border data flows is of outmost priority for regulators on both sides of the Atlantic given that the transatlantic economies of the EU and the US are inextricably linked built on a digital backbone supporting virtually every facet of commerce.

The new Privacy Shield considerably strengthens the privacy rights of EU citizens relating to onward transfer of personal information.  Key provisions of the Privacy Shield require adherence to the core privacy principles of notice, choice, security, integrity, access, enforcement and accountability for onward transfer.

Perhaps the most important aspect of the Privacy Shield is more rigorous access, monitoring and enforcement mechanisms that were lacking in the Safe Harbor. According to the European Commission’s statement, “for the first time, the US has given the EU written assurance that the access of public authorities for law enforcement and national security will be subject to clear limitations, safeguards, and oversight mechanisms and has ruled out indiscriminate mass surveillance of European citizens’ data.” By virtue of these strengthened enforcement mechanisms, EU citizens will be able to:

Seek redress for alleged privacy rights against companies who are obliged to resolve such complaints within 45 days;

  • Access to an Independent Dispute Resolution at no cost;
  • Work through EU Data Protection Authorities who are empowered to work with the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to ensure that EU citizen complaints are addressed and remedied; and
  • Opt for arbitration should their complaints be not resolved through the independent Dispute Resolution mechanism

Perhaps one of most sensitive matters that the EU-US Privacy Shield is designed to remedy is the overreach by the US government in its bulk data collection practices: “the U.S. government has given the EU written assurance from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence that any access of public authorities for national security purposes will be subject to clear limitations, safeguards and oversight mechanisms, preventing generalised access to personal data.” Finally, to empower EU citizens to seek judicial standing, President Obama signed into law the Judicial Redress Act, which provides EU citizens the same protections under the Privacy Act as are available to US citizens.

However the fate of the Privacy Shield remains uncertain. The policy implications of the new US Administration are of concern to EU regulators.   The Privacy Shield framework is pending review by the Article 29 Working Party (WP29).  There are a number of submissions under consideration, including pending assurances from the new Administration as to their continued commitment to a more robust protection of EU citizen privacy rights.  This includes adherence to the provisions of the GDPR when it becomes enforceable in 2018. 

In the meantime, US entities that are transferring EU citizens personal information may do so by incorporating Binding Corporate Rules (BCR) or Model Corporate Clauses both of which require adherence to safeguarding EU privacy rights for onward transfer of EU citizen data.

The state of the cross border data flows remains unsettled although encouraging signs point to ratification.


Need more help preparing for GDPR? Check out this FREE infographic.

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About the author:  Andrew Pery is a marketing executive with over 25 years of experience in the high technology sector focusing on content management and business process automation.  Currenly Andrew is CMO of Top Image Systems.  Andrew holds a Masters of Law degree with Distinction from Northwestern University is a Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/C) and a Certified Information Professional (CIP/AIIM).

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Topics: privacy, security, information security, gdpr

Guest Post - Medical Records: Getting Smarter but not Intelligent

Jul 13, 2017 10:17:00 AM by Dan Antion

Unfortunately, I’ve had a few recent encounters with our healthcare system. As you would expect, I paid attention to the recordkeeping process. The spectrum ranged from paper to born-digital and has me thinking about my health records in a new way.

If you’re interested in the backstory, you can read it on my personal blog. Suffice it to say, last Friday, I needed to establish an account with a local hospital’s online health portal. My expectations were low. Healthcare professionals have always impressed me with their medical knowledge and talent, not so much with the way they embrace technology. In general, I was pleasantly surprised.

I wasn’t surprised that the results from test taken at 2:00 AM were not available at 1:00 PM. I was surprised that the results from an MRI I had in May, from a radiology clinic affiliated with this hospital, were available.

  1. I found it reassuring to know that I was being given access to same record that my providers use.
  2. I wondered what else is in there. For example, I can see the MRI report, but can my ENT see the images of my brain?
  3. I had the thought that I want to consume all my healthcare through this network – being able to access these records has marketing value.

Today, this technology serves the providers and is extended to me. The fact that I like having access to this information means I have to  add a non-medical attribute to my healthcare decision making process, or I have more work to do.

I have the option to add other caregivers to the system. I like the fact that I can grant them that permission, but I worry that they will have their own systems that they will want me to use. I worry that we’ll end up with medical Kayck/Trivago-like middle men linking various healthcare systems. I worry that that will inevitably expose my health records to more companies.

You see the problem? This is information about me but it's not my information.

This realization made me think of the AIIM ELC meeting I attended in June where Robert Kahn, a man who was instrumental in the development of the Internet, spoke about Distributed Digital-Object Services. He described what may be the end game for Intelligent Information Management – when information belongs to the person, process or device that collects it or whose condition it represents.

What if my medical information existed as a distributed object that had its own storage, knew who I was, who my medical providers were, who my health insurance company was, and what if these entities could access and update that record as necessary, and as permitted by me?

I can almost hear the gears turning in some of your heads – How would this work? How would it be secured? This would make a lot of today’s technology obsolete – I worked with distributed objects in the late 1990s. This can work.

Robert Kahn, a man who once said during an interview that: "…the development of the Internet was a learning experience..." says it will happen.

As we explored the future of Information Management at that ELC meeting, we discussed the ways cybersecurity, regulations and emerging and disruptive technologies like blockchain, AI and machine learning, will all play roles in that future. The summary paper will be available soon, and since it will include the experience from the European ELC, I can’t wait to see it.

About today's guest poster - Dan Antion is the Chairman of the AIIM Board of Directors. He has spent almost 40 years developing information management systems, in a wide variety of industries. For the past 30 years, he has been Vice President, Information Services for American Nuclear Insurers, where he is responsible for data, content, and systems development across a broad range of platforms. His opinions do not represent American Nuclear Insurers, AIIM or the AIIM Board of Directors.

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Topics: medical records, cip, data, healthcare, information professional, content management, ecm, records management

[Working Lunch Series] Changing Times: The Future of ECM

Jul 12, 2017 1:09:00 PM by John Mancini

What are you having for lunch today? A tuna sandwich? A salad? No matter what you're having, we have the perfect side dish to go with it - learning! It is just as important to fuel your mind as it is your body. That's why we've created this "Working Lunch Blog Series." The idea here is simple - every Wednesday for the next 4 weeks we'll post a video of one of our most popular sessions from The AIIM Conference 2017. Grab a bite to eat and enjoy an educational video during your lunch hour! Or make it social and invite the whole staff to watch!

This week's session is "Changing Times: The Future of ECM" from Stephen Ludlow of OpenText.

In this video session, Stephen helps to bring some clarity to the buzz and chatter surrounding ECM. What does the future of ECM look like? What’s behind the shift from “content management” to “content services?” And what should organizations be doing to take advantage of tomorrow’s opportunities? Join product leaders from OpenText and Documentum as they review the current state of ECM and lay out a go-forward strategy that maximizes current investments while preparing for future success.
  • Increase understanding of the changes taking place in the strategy and practice of ECM
  • Gain insight into the new thinking being utilized to achieve ECM success
  • Learn about the emerging ecosystem of content services and how it can drive success
 
 
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Topics: content management, enterprise content management, ecm, intelligent information management

In Pursuit of the CIP: why did I wait so long?

Jul 10, 2017 9:25:00 AM by Peggy Winton

I have a confession to make: I was a CIP skeptic. That’s right; I often found myself questioning whether the body of knowledge CIP represents -- even in its redesigned form -- was truly relevant for today’s information stewards in leading the digital transformation charge. I wondered whether business strategists who comprise the fastest growing AIIM membership sector would find applicability therein? Or, was CIP simply a capstone on a lifelong career for those core (and fewer) content “specialists”?

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Topics: information certification, cip, information management, information, certified information professional, certification

Top 10 Digital Landfill Blog Posts for June

Jun 30, 2017 11:38:41 AM by John Mancini

Check them out...

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Topics: compliance, erm, electronic records management, content management, ecm, intelligent information management

Guest Post - Scan to Email is not the Right Way to Digitize Your Business

Jun 30, 2017 10:38:00 AM by Wouter Koelewijn

An increasing number of organizations are digitizing their business processes to improve productivity and reduce costs and the risk of human error. Often organizations start by scanning to email where a person scans a document which is sent into their personal email inbox and is then manually delivered to the final destination. This is extremely bad for businesses and replacing scan to email should be a key part of any organization’s digitization strategy.

How Scan to Email is Damaging Your Business

The manual nature of the scan to email process and its limitations are outdated and paradoxical to everything digitization aims to achieve. Scan to email also poses several issues which makes it harmful for your business, including:

  • Unsecure and Non-Compliant – A scanned document sent by email allows sensitive and confidential documents to be forwarded easily to anyone outside the company or to the wrong people internally. In industries that must adhere to compliance regulations to ensure privacy, the potential for human error or malicious behaviour can have serious consequences.
  • Inconsistent Document Format, Quality and File Naming – Today’s scan or multifunction printer devices are complicated with complex menu systems. The user has to make many decisions, including the output file type, scan quality settings and name of the document. This results in inconsistencies, making it difficult to manage digital content.
  • Limitations of Image Files – Traditional scan to email usually only creates an image file as a read-only PDF. Consequently text cannot be keyword searched and retrieved easily. Costly time is spent on searching for documents that could be better spent on more productive activities.
  • A misuse of Email – Any IT administrator will tell you that cost of email storage is expensive. Scanning to email, forwarding by email – clogs up email infrastructure. Rarely does anyone permanently delete scans sent by the printer.

What is the alternative?

So, what is the alternative?  Quite simply, companies should look for solutions that offer digital document workflows with built-in tools to eliminate these issues. Removing as much of the manual process as possible speeds up the process, improves accuracy and provides consistent digital content that can be searched and retrieved easily. Further, workflows that automatically send the encrypted digital document to a pre-defined, authorized destination is a critical need. The destination might be a cloud-based repository (such as Dropbox Business), an on premise electronic content management (ECM) or a line of business application. By defining an authorized destination and automatically routing the scanned document to that location, the possibility of digital files getting lost or into the wrong hands is eliminated. 

What are Digital Document Workflows?

Digital document workflows are templates that are set up by an administrator and determine scan parameters, including the quality, name, format as well as the destination of the document. These automated workflows simplify and secure the scan process for the user, reducing it to a simple and accurate one click process, all carried out at the scanner or MFD (multifunctional device). The document is output into a usable file format so that it can be both edited and searched to enable quick and easy retrieval. In terms of security, individuals only see the workflows they are authorized to use, making it quick, simple and secure.

Further, workflows can be created for a particular user or groups of users; for example for all users responsible for scanning invoices. In this way, all users create and distribute scans in a consistent manner. Let’s look at a particular use case for automated scan workflows.

Scan and forget

Compared to scan to email, digital document workflows enable the user to scan and forget. The workflow is predefined and with one press of a button, the document is scanned, stored and, if needed, an email is sent to someone automatically alerting them of the document’s arrival. In this sense, the user simply scans and forgets about the details as they are taken care of automatically.

Contrast this to scan to email. At the scan device, the user has to decide whether the scan will be a pdf or a jpg typically and the scan settings have to be chosen by stepping through complicated and confusing menu systems. This is repeated for each scan. Then it is back to the workstation to check email for the scan’s arrival. Next, open email and save the document with a name that makes sense for her (but maybe not for anyone else) to the desktop or networked folder. This is repeated for each scan. In many cases, an email is sent to someone to let them know the scan is on a networked folder or the email itself contains the scan (email clogging). In any of these steps, there is room for human error.

There is little doubt that scan to email is an outdated, inefficient process that poses a high risk of human error. Scan workflows remove these issues. For any organization looking to improve efficiency through digitalization, replacing scan to email is essential.

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About the author:  

Wouter Koelewijn is Senior Vice President, Managing Director, Y Soft Scanning Division and an outspoken advocate for simplifying scanning on MFD's (Multifunction Devices). Prior to working with Y Soft, Mr. Koelewijn founded X-Solutions in late 2002 which was later acquired by Nuance in 2009. Prior to X-Solutions, Wouter was the CTO and co-founder of a Xerox concessionaire in the Netherlands from 1994-2002. Mr. Koelewijn is married and has two children. He enjoys skiing, swimming and sailing.  Wouter.koelewijn@ysoft.com

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Topics: privacy, business process, scanning, capture, security, Digital business, information security, information capture, gdpr

About AIIM

AIIM provides market research, expert advice, and skills development to an empowered community of leaders committed to information-driven innovation.

Click to Download - The Next Wave: Moving from ECM to Intelligent Information Management

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