AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

Digital Transformation Means Tackling the Next Generation of Process Problems

Jun 8, 2017 8:17:31 AM by John Mancini

Digital Transformation requires that organizations meet a new generation of process challengesHolistic customer journeys that embrace multiple sub-systems and processes, often owned by different departments, require a different way of looking at process problems.  

Looking to specific industries, consider some of the following (per Michael Croal from Cornerstone Advisors).

Healthcare:

  • Patient Tracking: Admission to Discharge
  • Patient Billing: Service/Supply to Bill Satisfaction
  • Patient Surgery: Diagnoses to Follow-up

Energy:
  • New Production: Land Acquisition to 1st Barrel
  • Refining: Raw Material to Final Product

Insurance:

  • Claims Adjustment: Initial Contact to Final Resolution
  • New Policy: Request for Quote to Renewal

Banking:

  • New Customer/New Account: Sale to 1st Anniversary
  • Consumer Loan Delivery: Application to Lien Perfection
  • Mortgage Loan Delivery: Lead to Investor Sale
  • Commercial Loan Delivery: Expression of Interest to Annual Review
  • Collections: Past Due to Current
  • Loan Servicing: Boarding to Collateral Release

The next generation of business problems require a 360-degree view of information and access to this information – both data and content, in geometrically increasing volumes, and regardless of where it is stored. Organizations can no longer afford to look at data management and content management disciplines in isolation.

While all of the above processes are vastly different, their core characteristics say a lot about why the past bifurcation between data management and content management is becoming blurred and strained.

  • BOTH Data and content are needed to solve these problems.
  • The scale of the data and content challenge is increasing geometrically, and will increase even more rapidly with the internet of things.
  • The data and content needed to solve these problems does not reside in a single repository or system, but is scattered throughout the organization.
The data and content to solve these problems – assuming you can find it -- in many cases does not inherently contain sufficient metadata to make these information assets either understood or actionable. Traditional ETL (Extract, Transform, Load) approaches focus on bringing big data and content into a common data warehouse. These are proving to be too expensive, too complex, and too slow. Traditional relational/SQL databases are straining to meet big data demands and new semantic, NoSQL approaches are arising. And the world of content management is being transformed by concepts and disciplines from this new world of data.

Get my e-book, From Documents to Content to Data for more details.

Click to register for The AIIM Conference 2017

You might also be interested in...

What if your enterprise search was better and more encompassing? -- The power of semantics

Read More

Topics: data, content management, documents

Connecting the Dots Between Documents, Content, and Data

Mar 1, 2017 10:49:00 AM by John Mancini

Since the 1980s, relational databases have been used to store business information. They were a huge step forward over hierarchical databases, which organized data into rigid tree-like structures with connections between data elements defined by the links in the structures.

Read More

Topics: data, content management, documents

The Brave New World of Scanning and Capture -- Really?

Aug 2, 2012 5:00:00 AM by John F. Mancini

I recently purchased a new car from one of the largest car dealers in the country (privately owned, $55 million in annual revenues).  Given that I am notoriously cheap about cars, it was a very inexpensive car, and we paid cash.  After negotiating the deal, we went to the back room where we signed all of the documentation.  We signed the following forms:

Read More

Topics: Ford, automobiles, compliance, documentation, records, documents

8 image enhancement techniques in document capture

Apr 28, 2010 12:54:54 PM by John F. Mancini

Two main concerns for any document imaging exercise are the image quality and the file size. The objective:  get the best possible image quality while keeping the file size to a minimum. Thus image enhancement has become an essential step in a well defined capture workflow. 

Read More

Topics: oracle, 8 things, ocr, kofax, ecm, imaging, documents, scanning, VRS, Kodak

About AIIM

AIIM provides market research, expert advice, and skills development to an empowered community of leaders committed to information-driven innovation.

Click to Download - The Next Wave: Moving from ECM to Intelligent Information Management

Subscribe to Email Updates