AIIM - The Global Community of Information Professionals

Revenge of the Metadata Nerds

Sep 11, 2018 11:24:00 AM by John F. Mancini

We once had an IT person who worked for us who took a page out of the old Saturday Night Live routine, Nick Burns -- Your Company’s Computer Guy, who guarantees to “fix your computer and then make fun of you.”  

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Topics: metadata, content management, Compliance and records management, records management

The Pushmi-Pullyu Impact of Technology Innovation on Information Preservation

Mar 13, 2018 1:45:45 PM by John F. Mancini

It’s bad enough that those of us in the technology space use three letter acronyms as if we’re being paid per usage. So here's a quick definition of terms for those mystified by the title of this post. If you are not conversant in Dr. Doolittle (even the Eddie Murphy version), Pushmi-Pullyu is a "gazelle-unicorn cross that has two heads (one of each) at opposite ends of its body."

Many of you are aware that I’ve been working on a personal mystery project on the weekends that I’m publishing on Medium since it goes beyond the kind of thing we usually cover in this space (In search of my Grandparents -- A records management journey).

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Topics: archive, information governance, archiving, records management, information preservation

More articles about information management than any sane person should write

Mar 12, 2018 2:41:39 PM by John F. Mancini

Over 100 eBooks, Guest articles, and Tip Sheets from the past year or so -- 107 of them to be exact. Enjoy.

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Topics: information governance, information management, records management, intelligent information management

It's like Deja Vu all over again -- a Records Management classic

Feb 12, 2018 6:33:01 PM by John F. Mancini

As Yogi supposedly once said, it's like deja vu all over again.

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Topics: information governance, electronic records management, Compliance and records management, records management

4 Special Requirements Social Media and Collaboration Create for GDPR Compliance

Jan 26, 2018 9:29:26 AM by John F. Mancini

A new set of European rules and standards related to privacy and data protection (the General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR) has set in motion a mad compliance and security scramble not only for European companies, but also for any company doing business in Europe or with European customers. The regulation is designed to harmonize privacy across the EU, codify more rigorous privacy rights; strike a balance between privacy and security and create an explicit obligation for both data controllers and processors to demonstrate compliance with GDPR. The clock is ticking – the regulation goes into effect on May 25th, 2018, and the potential penalties for non-compliance are significant (organizations found to be in breach of GDPR may be fined up to 4% of annual revenues or 20 million Euro, whichever is the greater).

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Topics: collaboration, social media, records management, gdpr

Streamline and Automate: The Records Manager's Rally Cry

Dec 8, 2017 10:12:06 AM by Jesse Wilkins

Every business is in the business of the business. In other words, every organization - public sector or private, small or gigantic, and regardless of structure or geographic location, has a mission and organizational goals and objectives upon which it focuses.

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Topics: erm, electronic records management, records management

Guest Post - Medical Records: Getting Smarter but not Intelligent

Jul 13, 2017 10:17:00 AM by Dan Antion

Unfortunately, I’ve had a few recent encounters with our healthcare system. As you would expect, I paid attention to the recordkeeping process. The spectrum ranged from paper to born-digital and has me thinking about my health records in a new way.

If you’re interested in the backstory, you can read it on my personal blog. Suffice it to say, last Friday, I needed to establish an account with a local hospital’s online health portal. My expectations were low. Healthcare professionals have always impressed me with their medical knowledge and talent, not so much with the way they embrace technology. In general, I was pleasantly surprised.

I wasn’t surprised that the results from test taken at 2:00 AM were not available at 1:00 PM. I was surprised that the results from an MRI I had in May, from a radiology clinic affiliated with this hospital, were available.

  1. I found it reassuring to know that I was being given access to same record that my providers use.
  2. I wondered what else is in there. For example, I can see the MRI report, but can my ENT see the images of my brain?
  3. I had the thought that I want to consume all my healthcare through this network – being able to access these records has marketing value.

Today, this technology serves the providers and is extended to me. The fact that I like having access to this information means I have to  add a non-medical attribute to my healthcare decision making process, or I have more work to do.

I have the option to add other caregivers to the system. I like the fact that I can grant them that permission, but I worry that they will have their own systems that they will want me to use. I worry that we’ll end up with medical Kayck/Trivago-like middle men linking various healthcare systems. I worry that that will inevitably expose my health records to more companies.

You see the problem? This is information about me but it's not my information.

This realization made me think of the AIIM ELC meeting I attended in June where Robert Kahn, a man who was instrumental in the development of the Internet, spoke about Distributed Digital-Object Services. He described what may be the end game for Intelligent Information Management – when information belongs to the person, process or device that collects it or whose condition it represents.

What if my medical information existed as a distributed object that had its own storage, knew who I was, who my medical providers were, who my health insurance company was, and what if these entities could access and update that record as necessary, and as permitted by me?

I can almost hear the gears turning in some of your heads – How would this work? How would it be secured? This would make a lot of today’s technology obsolete – I worked with distributed objects in the late 1990s. This can work.

Robert Kahn, a man who once said during an interview that: "…the development of the Internet was a learning experience..." says it will happen.

As we explored the future of Information Management at that ELC meeting, we discussed the ways cybersecurity, regulations and emerging and disruptive technologies like blockchain, AI and machine learning, will all play roles in that future. The summary paper will be available soon, and since it will include the experience from the European ELC, I can’t wait to see it.

About today's guest poster - Dan Antion is the Chairman of the AIIM Board of Directors. He has spent almost 40 years developing information management systems, in a wide variety of industries. For the past 30 years, he has been Vice President, Information Services for American Nuclear Insurers, where he is responsible for data, content, and systems development across a broad range of platforms. His opinions do not represent American Nuclear Insurers, AIIM or the AIIM Board of Directors.

Click to Download "Healthcare Information Management"


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Topics: medical records, cip, data, healthcare, information professional, content management, ecm, records management

My 8 Favorite Things from Image Management circa 1989

Jan 26, 2017 9:43:18 AM by John Mancini

I was working in my home office yesterday, and during a conference call, happened to look up at my bookshelf and saw what appeared to be a VHS tape.

Marvelling at both my eyesight and my tendency to save stuff because we might need it "someday" - which is also the information governance strategy many organizations employ - I took it off the shelf, dusted it off, and gave it a look.

The title was intriguing - Images of Change - as was the creator - AIIM - and the date - 1989, 7 years before I got to there. And given that we've been engaged recently in a bit of an industry history quest, as well as searching for intriguing AIIM Conference #TBT posts, I decided last night to embark on a quest to our basement and see if we still owned any devices upon which to play this VHS beast and see what was on this tape.

Low and behold, in another testimony to my "someday" skills, I found an old GoVideo player, hooked it up to the TV, positioned my phone in front of the TV to capture the video, posted the video to Youtube, and voila -- digital preservation. Well, sort of.

My favorite parts in the movie (click HERE).

  1. Transmitting images via what was likely a 4800 bit/second modem.  This must certainly have been fun.
  2. No email or web CTAs for more information on AIIM ("Call us or write us for more information.")
  3. The mean guy who thought he had been "stood up" for the appointment.
  4. The curious fact that the main character goes to Dulles Airport to fly to Washington, DC.
  5. Re the medical scene, this was obviously pre-HIPAA.
  6. The cucumber-cool "Murder, She Wrote" jewelry lady.
  7. The Guy With the Spider Tatoo.
  8. They had secretaries.

Find out what's going on NOW in the information management space. Early bird discount for AIIM17 ends 1-31.

Click to register for The AIIM Conference 2017

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Topics: enterprise content management, ecm, records management, AIIM17

The 32 Scariest Information Management Data Points! And Zombies!

Oct 27, 2016 8:42:54 PM by John Mancini

It's almost Halloween.  The time when scary things are on everyone's mind.  And now, presenting here for the first time...drawn from a variety of AIIM market research studies...

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Topics: information governance, content management, records management, trends, Industry statistics and research, information chaos

Calling all Information Professionals – What #InfoGov Advice Would YOU give to this company?

May 12, 2016 12:47:31 PM by John Mancini

Calling all #InfoGov experts – What Advice Would YOU give?

I was thinking about one of the data points in our current State of the Industry Report (Free Executive Summary HERE) – the one that points to a rise in focus at large companies on risk and compliance as a primary business driver for IM.

The number of large organizations citing compliance and risk as the largest driver for IM has risen sharply in the past year from 38% to 59%. 44% of mid-sized organizations also cite this as the biggest driver whereas smaller organizations consider cost savings and productivity improvements to be more significant drivers.

To be honest, this data point bugged me a bit – it seemed at variance with some of my thoughts about Information Governance – i.e., that they key to moving Information Governance out of its narrow RM niche was to focus more on value rather than risk.

But I got a call from a significant company on the Fortune 1000 list (that will remain nameless for now) who posed a business problem that perhaps reinforces the above data point – but perhaps in a different way than I would normally consider the question. 

Here are the points he/she raised.  Kind of like a Harvard business case:

  1. We have our knowledge worker content currently in 3 places:  1) Google Docs; 2) an EFFS product; and 3) file shares.  We are not a SharePoint shop.
  2. We are not in an industry space like financial services or pharma where there are a lot of  industry-specific compliance or regulatory requirements.
  3. We want wherever possible to leave our existing information in place, and apply a “lite” governance layer (his/her words) above our 3 primary repositories that would allow us to understand what people are doing, apply retention and disposition where appropriate, be able to audit/verify these processes, and be able to apply holds should the occasion arise.
  4. Usability and simplicity – at both the administrative and individual knowledge worker level – is our top priority.
  5. In a nutshell, we want to be able to demonstrate that there is a level of adult supervision and accountability to how we manage our knowledge worker information. Does this need to be perfect, no.  Does it need to be a verifiable process, yes.
  6. We want to start with three departments, but then scale up.  Ultimately, the potential scale is quite large -- 10+ terabytes.
  7. We are not interested in a lot of workflow functionality at this point. Perhaps down the road, but for now this project is being driven by the legal folks. 
  8. The fundamental question we would like to address and at reasonable cost is a very basic one and one that you, John, have raised in your presentations:
Where should we tell our knowledge workers put their “stuff” so that it is…1) Secure, shareable, and searchable so the ORGANIZATION can accomplish its goals; and 2) Works the way they work and is useful to THEM in getting THEIR job done.

I have my own ideas about this, but I thought I would open it up to the community and perhaps everyone could share in the results. 

The Advice Clinic is Open.

What recommendations would you give, and why?

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You might also be interested in this white paper on EFFS technologies:

Download Now

 

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Topics: information governance, electronic records management, records management, efss

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